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Experimental Mechanics

, Volume 53, Issue 4, pp 579–592 | Cite as

Doubly Reinforcing Cementitious Beams with Instrumented Hollow Carbon Fiber Tendons

  • K. R. Biszick
  • J. A. Gilbert
  • H. A. Toutanji
  • M. T. Britz
Article
  • 195 Downloads

Abstract

Surface mounted strain gages are used to characterize the behavior of polymer-enhanced cementitious beams designed to withstand reverse loadings. These unique composite structures are doubly reinforced with hollow carbon fiber (graphite) tendons equipped with strain gages and the study includes section design, materials considerations, structural testing, and finite element analysis. The primary purpose of strain gage integration is to insure that the stress in the materials remains within the elastic range so that damage does not occur. A finite element model is developed to characterize the structural response in the elastic range and a hybrid approach is suggested in which displacement, strain, and stress can be obtained with a single strain gage. The ability to characterize structural performance beyond the elastic range is also demonstrated by analyzing data obtained from displacement-controlled tests.

Keywords

Structural health monitoring Doubly reinforced beams Cementitious materials Strain gages Hybrid analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the United States Army Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) of the Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, for supporting this research under the Department of Defense (DOD) SBIR Contract No. W31P4Q-05-C-R103. Portions of the study were also funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce under NOAA SBIR Contract No. WC133R-09-CN-0108. The authors would also like to thank Mr. Ravi K. Bommu for his work involving tendon development, Drs. Thomas Lavin and Bo Xu for their contributions to concrete development, and Mr. Rajesh Vuddandam for his contribution to beam testing with the data acquisition system. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies previously mentioned.

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Copyright information

© Society for Experimental Mechanics 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. R. Biszick
    • 1
  • J. A. Gilbert
    • 2
  • H. A. Toutanji
    • 3
  • M. T. Britz
    • 2
  1. 1.Optechnology, Inc.HuntsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of Alabama in HuntsvilleHuntsvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringUniversity of Alabama in HuntsvilleHuntsvilleUSA

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