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Sleep and Breathing

, Volume 20, Issue 4, pp 1255–1261 | Cite as

The benefit of HH during the CPAP titration in the cool sleeping environment

  • Yayong Li
  • Yina Wang
Sleep Breathing Physiology and Disorders • Original Article

Abstract

Purpose

Upper airway symptom associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment is an important factor influencing CPAP adherence. There are conflicting data on the effect of a heated humidifier (HH) during CPAP titration for patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study investigated the effects of HH during CPAP titration in the cool sleeping environment.

Methods

Forty newly diagnosed OSAHS patients who received CPAP titration in the cool sleeping environment were randomly assigned to HH and non-HH groups. A questionnaire was used to evaluate upper airway symptoms, satisfaction with initial CPAP treatment, and willingness to further use CPAP. Some therapy parameters including leak, apnea hypopnea index (AHI) reduction, and optimal CPAP pressure level were analyzed. We compared these subjective and objective data between the two groups.

Results

In subjective sensation, the use of HH can alleviate upper airway symptoms associated with CPAP titration (P < 0.001). The HH group has benefit in satisfaction with initial CPAP treatment (P < 0.001) and further willingness to use CPAP (P < 0.01), although there were no significant differences in leak, AHI reduction, and optimal CPAP pressure between the two groups.

Conclusions

The use of HH is recommended during CPAP titration in the cool sleeping environment because of its benefit in the treatment of upper airway symptoms associated with CPAP therapy and improvement of the CPAP acceptance.

Keywords

Continuous positive airway pressure Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome Heated humidifier 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Scientific Fund of PR China (no.81100059).

Compliance with ethical standards

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Funding

This study was funded by National Natural Scientific Fund of PR China (no.81100059).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EmergencyThe Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of GeriatricsThe Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China

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