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Metabolomics

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 176–178 | Cite as

Navigating the road ahead: addressing challenges for use of metabolomics in epidemiology studies

  • Majda Haznadar
  • Padma Maruvada
  • Eliza Mette
  • John Milner
  • Steven C. Moore
  • Holly L. Nicastro
  • Joshua N. Sampson
  • L. Joseph Su
  • Mukesh Verma
  • Krista A. ZanettiEmail author
Opinion

Metabolomics platforms allow for the measurement of hundreds to thousands of unique small chemical entities, as well as offer extensive coverage of metabolic markers related to obesity, diet, smoking, and other exposures of high interest to health scientists. Nevertheless, its potential use as a tool in population-based study design has not been fully explored. As the field of metabolomics continues to mature, and in part, accelerate through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) investment of $65 million in the Common Fund’s Metabolomics Program (https://commonfund.nih.gov/metabolomics/index), it is time to consider those challenges most pertinent to epidemiologic studies.

Study-level challenges

To design and conduct high quality studies, at minimum the investigator must identify the general biological pathways of interest, the number of study participants and identify metabolomic endpoints a priori. Metabolomics provides a broad assessment of biology; therefore, investigators must...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Majda Haznadar
    • 1
  • Padma Maruvada
    • 2
  • Eliza Mette
    • 3
  • John Milner
    • 4
  • Steven C. Moore
    • 5
  • Holly L. Nicastro
    • 6
  • Joshua N. Sampson
    • 5
  • L. Joseph Su
    • 3
  • Mukesh Verma
    • 3
  • Krista A. Zanetti
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Center for Cancer ResearchNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Digestive Diseases and NutritionNational Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney DiseasesBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Division of Cancer Control and Population SciencesNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  4. 4.Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of AgricultureBeltsvilleUSA
  5. 5.Division of Cancer Epidemiology and GeneticsNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA
  6. 6.Divison of Cancer PreventionNational Cancer InstituteRockvilleUSA

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