Regulation of bone and cartilage by adenosine signaling

Abstract

There is growing recognition that bone serves important endocrine and immunologic functions that are compromised in several disease states. While many factors are known to affect bone metabolism, recent attention has focused on investigating the role of purinergic signaling in bone formation and regulation. Adenosine is a purine nucleoside produced intracellularly and extracellularly in response to stimuli such as hypoxia and inflammation, which then interacts with P1 receptors. Numerous studies have suggested that these receptors play a pivotal role in osteoblast, osteoclast, and chondrocyte differentiation and function. This review discusses the various ways by which adenosine signaling contributes to bone and cartilage homeostasis, while incorporating potential therapeutic applications of these signaling pathways.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (AR056672, AR068593) and the NYU-HHC Clinical and Translational Science Institute (UL1TR000038).

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Correspondence to Bruce N. Cronstein.

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This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Conflict of Interest

Lauren Strazzulla, none. Bruce Cronstein, Consultations: AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co., Bristol-Myers, Squibb. Grants: Celgene, AstraZeneca, Gilead. Equity: CanFite BioPharma. Intellectual Property: Multiple issued and pending patents assigned to NYU School of Medicine.

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Strazzulla, L.C., Cronstein, B.N. Regulation of bone and cartilage by adenosine signaling. Purinergic Signalling 12, 583–593 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11302-016-9527-2

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Keywords

  • Adenosine receptors
  • Bone metabolism
  • Purinergic signaling
  • Chondrocytes