Tree Genetics & Genomes

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 805–812 | Cite as

A newly identified locus controls complete resistance to Microcyclus ulei in the Fx2784 rubber clone

  • Vincent Le Guen
  • Dominique Garcia
  • Carlos Mattos
  • Olivier Fouet
  • Fabien Doaré
  • Virgile Condina
  • Marc Seguin
Original Paper

Abstract

Using cultivars which are genetically resistant to South American leaf blight (SALB) caused by the fungus Microcyclus ulei is the only way to plant rubber trees in disease-affected areas. Numerous field observations led to the hypothesis that the resistance of the cultivar Fx2784 to SALB is likely to be monogenic. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis by examining the distribution of the trait in a cross between the resistant cultivar and a susceptible one. The individuals resulting from this cross were planted in field trials in French Guiana and Brazil. The resistance of all the trees was assessed by field observations. Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) using microsatellite markers was performed in French Guiana to determine which markers were genetically linked to resistance, and the results were validated by field observations in Brazil. In both locations, a 1:1 segregation of the resistance trait was observed, thus reinforcing the monogenic hypothesis. BSA showed tight linkage between resistance and the microsatellite markers located in linkage group 2 in the Hevea genome and enabled to pinpoint the resistance locus. The location was confirmed by observations on the trees planted in Brazil. This result should facilitate the use of Fx2784 resistance in future breeding programs for SALB resistance. This is the third major locus conferring resistance to SALB identified in rubber tree (Hevea spp.). These three loci are genetically independent, a favorable situation for genetic improvement of SALB resistance.

Keywords

Hevea brasiliensis Microcyclus ulei Complete resistance 

Supplementary material

11295_2013_599_MOESM1_ESM.docx (4.1 mb)
ESM 1(DOCX 4185 kb)

References

  1. Bos H, McIndoe KG (1965) Breeding of Hevea for resistance against Dothidella ulei P. Henn. J Rubb Res Inst Malaysia 19:98–107Google Scholar
  2. Brun H, Chèvre A-M, Fitt BD, Powers S, Besnard A-L, Ermel M, Huteau V, Marquer B, Eber F, Renard M, Andrivon D (2010) Quantitative resistance increases the durability of qualitative resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Brassica napus. New Phytol 185:285–299PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chee KH (1976) Assessing susceptibility of Hevea clones to Microcyclus ulei. Ann Appl Biol 84:135–145CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chee KH, Holliday P (1986) South American leaf blight of Hevea rubber. IRRDB Monographs, Kuala LumpurGoogle Scholar
  5. Darmono TW, Chee KH (1985) Reaction of Hevea clones to races of Microcyclus ulei in Brazil. J Rubb Res Inst Malaysia 33:1–8Google Scholar
  6. Durel CE, Parisi L, Laurens F, Van de Weg WE, Liebhard R, Jourjon MF (2003) Genetic dissection of partial resistance to race 6 of Venturia inaequalis in apple. Genome 46:224–234PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Garcia D, Carels N, Martins Koop D, Araujo de Souza L, De Andrade Junior SJ, Pujade Renaud V, Mattos CRR, Cascardo JCM (2011) EST profiling of resistant and susceptible Hevea infected by Microcyclus ulei. Physiol Mol Plant Pathol 76:126–136CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gonçalves JRC (1968) The resistance of Fx and IAN rubber clones to leaf diseases in Brazil. Trop Agric Trin 45:331–336Google Scholar
  9. Gygax M, Gianfranceschi L, Liebhard R, Kellerhals M, Gessler C, Patocchi A (2004) Molecular markers linked to the apple scab resistance gene Vbj derived from Malus baccata jackii. Theor Appl Genet 109:1702–1709PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Le Guen V, Lespinasse D, Oliver G, Rodier-Goud M, Pinard F, Seguin M (2003) Molecular mapping of genes conferring field resistance to South American leaf blight (Microcyclus ulei) in rubber tree. Theor Appl Genet 108:160–167PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Le Guen V, Garcia D, Mattos CRR, Doaré F, Lespinasse D, Seguin M (2007) Bypassing of a polygenic Microcyclus ulei resistance in rubber tree, analyzed by QTL detection. New Phytol 173:335–345PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Le Guen V, Doaré F, Weber C, Seguin M (2009) Genetic structure of Amazonian populations of Hevea brasiliensis is shaped by hydrographical network and isolation by distance. Tree Genet Genomes 5:673–683CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Le Guen V, Garcia D, Doaré F, Mattos CRR, Condina V, Couturier C, Chambon A, Weber C, Espéout S, Seguin M (2011a) A rubber tree's durable resistance to Microcyclus ulei is conferred by a qualitative gene and a major quantitative resistance factor. Tree Genet Genomes 7:877–889CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Le Guen V, Gay C, Xiong T-C, Souza LM, Rodier-Goud M, Seguin M (2011b) Development and characterization of 296 new polymorphic microsatellite markers for rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). Plant Breed 130:294–296CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Lespinasse D, Grivet L, Troispoux V, Rodier-Goud M, Pinard F, Seguin M (2000a) Identification of QTLs involved in the resistance to South American leaf blight (Microcyclus ulei) in the rubber tree. Theor Appl Genet 100:975–984CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Lespinasse D, Rodier-Goud M, Grivet L, Leconte A, Legnate H, Seguin M (2000b) A saturated genetic linkage map of rubber tree (Hevea spp.) based on RFLP, AFLP, microsatellite, and isozyme markers. Theor Appl Genet 100:127–138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Mattos CRR, Garcia D, Pinard F, Le Guen V (2003) Variabilidade de isolados de Microcyclus ulei no sudeste da Bahia. Fitopatol Bras 28:502–507CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Michelmore RW, Paran I, Kesseli RV (1991) Identification of markers linked to disease-resistance genes by bulk segregant analysis: a rapid method to detect markers in specific genomic regions by using segregating populations. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88:9828–9832PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Nelson RR (1978) Genetics of horizontal resistance to plant diseases. Annu Rev Phytopathol 16:359–378CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Palloix A, Ayme V, Moury B (2009) Durability of plant major resistance genes to pathogens depends on the genetic background, experimental evidence and consequences for breeding strategies. New Phytol 183:190–199PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Pedersen WL (1988) Pyramiding major genes for resistance to maintain residual effects. Annu Rev Phytopathol 26:369–378CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Prapan K, Lekawipat N, Weber C, Rodier-Goud M, Clément-Demange A, Seguin M (2006) Molecular genetic markers and rubber breeding in Thailand. 1 - Genetic mapping of the family RRIM600 × PB217 by use of microsatellite markers. In: Proceedings of the second Thai–French Seminar on “Rubber: From Tree to End-Products”. Cirad, Bangkok, p 10pGoogle Scholar
  23. Tabor GM, Kubisiak TL, Klopfenstein NB, Hall RB, Mac Nabb HSJ (2000) Bulked segregant analysis identifies molecular markers linked to Melampsora medusae resistance in Populus deltoides. Phytopathology 90:1039–1042PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Townsend CHT (1960) Progress in developing superior hevea clones in Brazil. Econ Bot 14:189–196CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Ule E (1905) Kautschukgewinnung und Kautschuckhandel am Amazonen-strome. Tropenpflanzer-Beihefte 6:1–71Google Scholar
  26. Van Ooijen JW (2006) JoinMap® 4, Software for the calculation of genetic linkage maps in experimental populations 4.0. Kyazma, WageningenGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent Le Guen
    • 1
  • Dominique Garcia
    • 1
  • Carlos Mattos
    • 2
  • Olivier Fouet
    • 1
  • Fabien Doaré
    • 3
  • Virgile Condina
    • 3
  • Marc Seguin
    • 1
  1. 1.UMR AGAPCIRADMontpellierFrance
  2. 2.Plantações Michelin da BahiaItuberá, BahiaBrazil
  3. 3.UPR BioagresseursCIRADKourouFrance

Personalised recommendations