Journal of Experimental Criminology

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 399–428 | Cite as

Community-oriented policing to reduce crime, disorder and fear and increase satisfaction and legitimacy among citizens: a systematic review

  • Charlotte Gill
  • David Weisburd
  • Cody W. Telep
  • Zoe Vitter
  • Trevor Bennett
Article

Abstract

Objectives

Systematically review and synthesize the existing research on community-oriented policing to identify its effects on crime, disorder, fear, citizen satisfaction, and police legitimacy.

Methods

We searched a broad range of databases, websites, and journals to identify eligible studies that measured pre-post changes in outcomes in treatment and comparison areas following the implementation of policing strategies that involved community collaboration or consultation. We identified 25 reports containing 65 independent tests of community-oriented policing, most of which were conducted in neighborhoods in the United States. Thirty-seven of these comparisons were included in a meta-analysis.

Results

Our findings suggest that community-oriented policing strategies have positive effects on citizen satisfaction, perceptions of disorder, and police legitimacy, but limited effects on crime and fear of crime.

Conclusions

Our review provides important evidence for the benefits of community policing for improving perceptions of the police, although our findings overall are ambiguous. The challenges we faced in conducting this review highlight a need for further research and theory development around community policing. In particular, there is a need to explicate and test a logic model that explains how short-term benefits of community policing, like improved citizen satisfaction, relate to longer-term crime prevention effects, and to identify the policing strategies that benefit most from community participation.

Keywords

Community policing Crime prevention Evaluation research Legitimacy Meta-analysis Problem solving Systematic review 

Supplementary material

11292_2014_9210_MOESM1_ESM.docx (65 kb)
ESM 1(DOCX 64 kb)

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Note that, in the References:* Denotes a reference to a study included in the systematic review** Denotes a reference to a study included in both the systematic review and meta-analysis

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlotte Gill
    • 1
  • David Weisburd
    • 2
    • 1
  • Cody W. Telep
    • 3
  • Zoe Vitter
    • 1
  • Trevor Bennett
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, Department of Criminology, Law and SocietyGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Criminology, Faculty of LawHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael
  3. 3.School of Criminology and Criminal JusticeArizona State UniversityPhoenixUSA
  4. 4.Centre for CriminologyUniversity of South WalesPontypriddUK

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