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Journal of Experimental Criminology

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 371–398 | Cite as

Generating knowledge: a case study of the National Policing Improvement Agency program on systematic reviews in policing

  • Cody W. Telep
  • David Weisburd
Article

Abstract

Objectives

To review what we have learned from the policing systematic reviews funded by the National Policing Improvement Agency (NPIA) and to examine the importance of funding and influential individuals in advancing scientific knowledge.

Methods

We use the history of randomized experiments in criminology and policing to emphasize how influential individuals and funding agencies have played a key role in advancing science in particular areas. We focus on the impact the NPIA has had on dramatically increasing the number of policing systematic reviews and advancing knowledge about effective policing strategies.

Results

The nine completed Campbell reviews funded by the NPIA have more than doubled the number of Campbell Collaboration reviews related to policing and have increased our knowledge about a number of policing programs and strategies. Collectively, these reviews suggest a number of areas where the police can be successful in increasing fairness and effectiveness in policing.

Conclusions

Key individuals, particularly when connected to funding agencies, can have a major impact on the trajectory of scientific knowledge. The NPIA program on systematic reviews in policing demonstrates the influence dedicated funding can have on advancing our knowledge on important policing topics.

Keywords

Funding Meta-analysis National Policing Improvement Agency Systematic review 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Thanks to the anonymous reviewers for their very helpful suggestions. Thanks also to Peter Neyroud for providing us with valuable insights on the NPIA and the College of Policing in the UK and to Charlotte Gill for providing us with useful information about the NPIA grants and the Campbell Collaboration.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Criminology and Criminal JusticeArizona State UniversityPhoenixUSA
  2. 2.Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, Department of Criminology, Law and SocietyGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  3. 3.Faculty of Law, Institute of CriminologyHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael

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