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Species of Agave with antimicrobial activity against selected pathogenic bacteria and fungi

  • Ángeles Verástegui
  • Julia Verde
  • Santos García
  • Norma Heredia
  • Azucena Oranday
  • Catalina Rivas
Short Communication

Abstract

The in vitro antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria, yeast, and molds were examined in extracts of the Agave species A. lecheguilla, A. picta, A. scabra and A. lophanta using an agar diffusion technique. The extracts of A. picta produced zones of inhibition of 9–13 mm for E. coli, L. monocytogenes, S. aureus, and V. cholerae, while B. cereus and Y. enterocolitica were not inhibited. The other Agave species did not show any detectable inhibitory activity against the bacteria tested; however, all four Agave sp. were inhibitory against all yeast and molds analyzed as evident by 9–20 mm zones of inhibition. The minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) of the active extract ranged from 1.8 to 7.0 mg/ml for the sensitive bacteria, and 2.0–3.0 mg/ml for yeast. In the case of molds, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the active extracts ranged from 3.0 to 6.0 mg/ml. Together, these data suggest that the Agave sp. analyzed are potential antimicrobial candidates with a broad range of activity.

Keywords

Agave Antibacterial Antifungal Antimicrobial Microbicidal Natural products Plant extracts 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de México (CONACYT) and by Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. Angeles Verastegui was a CONACYT Fellow.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ángeles Verástegui
    • 1
  • Julia Verde
    • 1
  • Santos García
    • 1
  • Norma Heredia
    • 1
  • Azucena Oranday
    • 1
  • Catalina Rivas
    • 1
  1. 1.Facultad de Ciencias BiológicasUniversidad Autónoma de Nuevo LeónSan NicolasMexico

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