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Spatiotemporal Trend Analysis of Extreme Rainfall Events in Victoria, Australia

Abstract

Extreme rainfall events are among the natural hazards with catastrophic impacts on human society. Trend analysis is important to understand the effects of climate change and variability on extreme rainfalls. In this study, extreme rainfall (i.e., annual maximums) trends were investigated in Victoria (Australia) using data from 23 stations for storm durations of 10 and 30 min, and 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The Mann-Kendal and Spearman’s Rho tests were employed for detection of temporal trends. Moreover, the spatial variability of extreme rainfall trends was investigated through interpolation of Theil-Sen’s estimator over Victoria. In general, increasing extreme rainfall trends were detected for short storm durations (i.e., 10 and 30 min, and 1 and 3 h), whereas decreasing extreme rainfall trends were found for long storm durations (i.e., 6, 12, 24 and 48 h). Increasing trends for short storm durations were mostly statistically significant, while decreasing trends for long storm durations were statistically insignificant. Trend analysis with respect to the four regions (i.e., Western, Northern, Central and Gippsland) in Victoria showed that increasing trends were present in general in the Northern and east Central Region, whereas decreasing trends were detected in the Western and west Gippsland Regions.

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Yilmaz, A.G., Perera, B.J.C. Spatiotemporal Trend Analysis of Extreme Rainfall Events in Victoria, Australia. Water Resour Manage 29, 4465–4480 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11269-015-1070-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11269-015-1070-3

Keywords

  • Extreme rainfall
  • Trend
  • Spatial variability