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Repeat and Non-returning Volunteers: The Promise of Episodic Events for Volunteer Recruitment and Retention

Abstract

In this article, we are concerned with the recruitment potential of one-off episodic events for attracting and retaining volunteers. Our specific focus is on the neglected pool of non-returning volunteers. These are one-off event participants who are unwilling to volunteer again in future. Many studies generally document an overwhelming willingness of people to repeat volunteering after participating in a one-off event, either due to reasons of social desirability or because they had a good volunteering experience. The positive participant reaction at most one-off events leads to the assumption that such events are useful arenas in which to generate a pool of potential repeat volunteers. Yet, scant attention is given to those people at the events who have no inclination for further volunteering. This article addresses that gap. It is part of a special issue on episodic volunteering from an international perspective and uses data from nineteen countries across the world. Our statistical analyses, which compares returning and non-returning volunteers, finds that on average, 7.42% of episodic event participants do not want to volunteer again in future. The results reveal that younger, less educated, novices who participate on their own are more likely to report unwillingness to repeat volunteering. Non-repeat volunteers unexpectedly had higher levels of altruistic motivation, and as expected, a less satisfactory one-off volunteer experience. The article concludes with implications and recommendations for organizers of events employing episodic volunteers.

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Notes

  1. See Authors (in press) for an overview of this study, definitions of episodic volunteering, and full methodological approach.

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Correspondence to Sara Compion.

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Compion, S., Meijs, L., Cnaan, R.A. et al. Repeat and Non-returning Volunteers: The Promise of Episodic Events for Volunteer Recruitment and Retention. Voluntas (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-022-00452-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-022-00452-z

Keywords

  • Episodic volunteering
  • Retention
  • Social embeddedness
  • Motivation
  • Volunteer satisfaction