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Methods in the Third Sector: Collective Memory-Work in a Complexity Framework

Abstract

Collective Memory-Work (CMW) is a qualitative research method involving the collective analysis of a set of focused memories. It enables an in-depth understanding of why people act in the way they do from their own lived experience, within a given social/political context. It is unique in providing participants with control over the entire research process and is capable of developing insights that challenge existing taken for granted knowledge. CMW draws on the ontological and epistemological assumptions of complexity theory. It is well positioned to explore new research questions within third sector research that have hitherto remained unanswered.

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Correspondence to Jenny Onyx.

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Onyx, J. Methods in the Third Sector: Collective Memory-Work in a Complexity Framework. Voluntas (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-021-00405-y

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Keywords

  • Collective memory-work
  • Complexity theory
  • Research method