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Duck sewage source coliphage P762 can lyse STEC and APEC

Abstract

Multiple pathogenic types or serotypes restrict treatment for colibacillosis. In addition, rising antibiotic resistance has heightened public awareness to prevent and control pathogenic Escherichia coli. The bacteriophage is a viable technique to treat colibacillosis as an alternative to antibiotics. P762, a coliphage isolated from duck farm sewage, was demonstrated to cloud lyse Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia Coli serotypes O157 and non-O157 (17/39), Avian pathogenic E. coli covered serotype O78, O83, and O9 (5/19), and other pathogenic Escherichia coli (5/17). Additional fundamental biological characteristics analysis revealed that P762 is stable at pH 3 ~ 11 and temperature between 4 °C and 60 °C, and its optimum multiplicity of infection (MOI) is 0.1. The one-step curve of P762 exhibited three bursts of growth stage: two rapid and one slow stage. Furthermore, the first rapid burst size is 80 CFU/PFU, the burst size of the slow stage is 10 CFU/PFU, and the second rapid burst size is about 990 CFU/PFU. In addition, P762 can form a "halo" on a double agar plate, implying that the phage secretes depolymerase. With 95.14% identity and 90% query coverage, genome sequence analysis revealed that P762 is most closely related to Escherichia phage DY1, which belongs to the genus Kayfunavirus. After screening using RAST and VFDB, no virulence factors were discovered in P762. In vitro antibacterial tests revealed that P762 has high bactericidal activity in lettuce leaves contaminated with STEC. In conclusion, phage P762 might be employed in the future to prevent and control pathogenic Escherichia coli.

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Data availability

The annotated whole-genome sequence of phage P762 were deposited in the GenBank database under accession number: MW876471.

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Funding

This study was supported by by the following funds: Xinjiang Joint Project of National Natural Science Foundation of China: Targeted screening of virulent phage and its prevention and control in E.coli.( U1803109). Modern agriculture (waterfowl) industrial technology system innovation team for disease prevention and control of Jiangsu (BE2017654). The project of supporting outstanding young talents in universities of anhui province (gxyq2019201). Wuhu Institute of Technology level science and technology team (wzykjtd202002). Animal epidemic prevention and quarantine teaching team of Anhui quality engineering project (2020jxtd282).

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Correspondence to Haiyan Zhang or Wei Zhang.

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Kong, X., Wang, H., Guo, G. et al. Duck sewage source coliphage P762 can lyse STEC and APEC. Virus Genes (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11262-022-01915-7

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Keywords

  • Bacteriophage
  • Phage therapy
  • STEC
  • APEC
  • Pan-genome