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Geographically distant isolates of the persistent southern tomato virus (STV) show very low genetic diversity in the putative coat protein gene

Abstract

Southern tomato virus (STV) from genus Amalgavirus (Family Amalgaviridae) is a persistent virus infecting tomato crops worldwide. Information on genetic diversity and evolutionary mechanisms for plant persistent viruses are very scarce in comparison with plant acute viruses. In this work, the putative coat protein gene of worldwide STV isolates was analyzed showing very low nucleotide diversity (< 0.0100). Phylogenetic analysis separated STV isolates into two clades, but no correlation was found between genetic and geographic distances. Also, no recombination events among STV isolates were detected. Comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions indicated negative selection at the amino acid level.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Ana Espino (Laboratory of Plant Health, Dirección General de Agricultura, Tenerife, Spain), Purificación Benito (Laboratory of Phytopathology, Cabildo de Gran Canaria, Great Canary Island, Spain), and Ana Alfaro Fernández and María Isabel Font San Ambrosio (Laboratory of Virology, Instituto Agroforestal Mediterráneo, Universistat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain) for providing some STV isolates.

Funding

This research was supported by the INIA research project E-RTA2014-00010-C02 co-funded by FEDER 2014‐2020 funds.

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LEG carried out the experiments and LR performed the biocomputational analysis. LG designed the experimental procedures of this research work and wrote the manuscript as well. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Correspondence to L. Galipienso.

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The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

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Elvira-González, L., Rubio, L. & Galipienso, L. Geographically distant isolates of the persistent southern tomato virus (STV) show very low genetic diversity in the putative coat protein gene. Virus Genes 56, 668–672 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11262-020-01785-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11262-020-01785-x

Keywords

  • Southern tomato virus
  • Amalgaviridae
  • Genetic diversity
  • Phylogeny
  • Evolution