Advertisement

Virus Genes

, Volume 54, Issue 6, pp 823–827 | Cite as

Isolation of Pteropine orthoreovirus from Pteropus vampyrus in Garut, Indonesia

  • Hitoshi Takemae
  • Chaerul Basri
  • Ni Luh Putu Ika Mayasari
  • Ronald Tarigan
  • Hiroshi Shimoda
  • Tsutomu Omatsu
  • Supratikno
  • Didik Pramono
  • Danang Dwi Cahyadi
  • Ryosuke Kobayashi
  • Keisuke Iida
  • Tetsuya Mizutani
  • Ken Maeda
  • Srihadi Agungpriyono
  • Eiichi HondoEmail author
Article

Abstract

Flying foxes belonging to the genus Pteropus are known to be reservoirs of zoonotic viruses. In this study, we describe the isolation of Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) from rectal swab samples of Pteropus vampyrus in Indonesia. PRV is an emerging zoonotic respiratory virus that can be transmitted from bats to humans. Rectal swabs (n = 91) were screened by PCR for PRV and 10 (11%) were positive. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences indicated that the S2, S3, S4, M3, L2, and L3 segments of one isolate (Garut-69) were closely related to previously isolated strains in Indonesia. The remaining gene segments showed both similarity and genetic divergence with other PRV strains, suggesting that re-assortment events had occurred. This is the first report of PRV infection to P. vampyrus in West Java, Indonesia.

Keywords

Indonesia Pteropine orthoreovirus Pteropus vampyrus Phylogenetic analysis PCR 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) within the framework of Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS).

Author contributions

HT, TM, KM, SA and EH designed the study. Sample collection from flying foxes was performed by HT, CB, NLPIM, RT, HS, S, DP, DDC, RK, KI, KM, and EH. HT carried out virus isolation, high-throughput sequencing and PCR. CB, NLPIM, RT, HS, and KM contributed to cell culture experiments. TO and TM contributed to sequencing data and PCR analysis. HT wrote the initial draft. TM and EH edited the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines of the care and use of animals were followed. Flying foxes were captured with the permission issued by the director-general for the conservation of natural resources and ecosystems, Indonesian Ministry of Forestry (No. SK.211/KSDAE/SET/KSA.2/7/2016). The permission for sample collection from 100 individuals per year is also specified in this document. The permission for catching flying foxes with a net was authorized by the regional office of environment and forestry in Garut (No. BA.09/BBKSDA.JABAR-5.1/Res Wil XVIII/2016 in September 2016, BA.07/SKW-5/Sancang/3/2017 in March 2017). The wild animal transportation permit was authorized by the regional office of environment and forestry in Ciamis (SI.953/BBKSDA-JABAR.5/2016 in September 2016, SI.360/BKW.III/3/2017 in March 2017). The procedures for sample collection were carried out under the permission by the animal ethics committee in Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia.

Supplementary material

11262_2018_1603_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.2 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 1262 KB)

References

  1. 1.
    Calisher CH, Childs JE, Field HE, Holmes KV, Schountz T (2006) Bats: important reservoir hosts of emerging viruses. Clin Microbiol Rev 19(3):531–545CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tan YF, Teng CL, Chua KB, Voon K (2017) Pteropine orthoreovirus: an important emerging virus causing infectious disease in the tropics? J Infect Dev Ctries 11(3):215–219CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Chua KB, Crameri G, Hyatt A, Yu M, Tompang MR, Rosli J, McEachern J, Crameri S, Kumarasamy V, Eaton BT et al (2007) A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(27):11424–11429CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Chua KB, Voon K, Crameri G, Tan HS, Rosli J, McEachern JA, Suluraju S, Yu M, Wang LF (2008) Identification and characterization of a new orthoreovirus from patients with acute respiratory infections. PLoS ONE 3(11):e3803CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cheng P, Lau CS, Lai A, Ho E, Leung P, Chan F, Wong A, Lim W (2009) A novel reovirus isolated from a patient with acute respiratory disease. J Clin Virol 45(1):79–80CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Chua KB, Voon K, Yu M, Keniscope C, Abdul Rasid K, Wang LF (2011) Investigation of a potential zoonotic transmission of orthoreovirus associated with acute influenza-like illness in an adult patient. PLoS ONE 6(10):e25434CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wong AH, Cheng PK, Lai MY, Leung PC, Wong KK, Lee WY, Lim WW (2012) Virulence potential of fusogenic orthoreoviruses. Emerg Infect Dis 18(6):944–948CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Yamanaka A, Iwakiri A, Yoshikawa T, Sakai K, Singh H, Himeji D, Kikuchi I, Ueda A, Yamamoto S, Miura M et al (2014) Imported case of acute respiratory tract infection associated with a member of species nelson bay orthoreovirus. PLoS ONE 9(3):e92777CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Gard G, Compans RW (1970) Structure and cytopathic effects of Nelson Bay virus. J Virol 6(1):100–106PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Pritchard LI, Chua KB, Cummins D, Hyatt A, Crameri G, Eaton BT, Wang LF (2006) Pulau virus; a new member of the Nelson Bay orthoreovirus species isolated from fruit bats in Malaysia. Arch Virol 151:229–239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Du L, Lu Z, Fan Y, Meng K, Jiang Y, Zhu Y, Wang S, Gu W, Zou X, Tu C (2010) Xi River virus, a new bat reovirus isolated in southern China. Arch Virol 155(8):1295–1299CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Hu T, Qiu W, He B, Zhang Y, Yu J, Liang X, Zhang W, Chen G, Zhang Y, Wang Y et al (2014) Characterization of a novel orthoreovirus isolated from fruit bat, China. BMC Microbiol 14:293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Lorusso A, Teodori L, Leone A, Marcacci M, Mangone I, Orsini M, Capobianco-Dondona A, Camma’ C, Monaco F, Savini G (2015) A new member of the Pteropine Orthoreovirus species isolated from fruit bats imported to Italy. Infect Genet Evol 30:55–58CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Taniguchi S, Maeda K, Horimoto T, Masangkay JS, Puentespina R Jr, Alvarez J, Eres E, Cosico E, Nagata N, Egawa K et al (2017) First isolation and characterization of pteropine orthoreovirus in fruit bats in the Philippines. Arch Virol 162(6):1529–1539CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Egawa K, Shimojima M, Taniguchi S, Nagata N, Tani H, Yoshikawa T, Kurosu T, Watanabe S, Fukushi S, Saijo M (2017) Virulence, pathology, and pathogenesis of Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) in BALB/c mice: Development of an animal infection model for PRV. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11(12):e0006076CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hitoshi Takemae
    • 1
  • Chaerul Basri
    • 2
  • Ni Luh Putu Ika Mayasari
    • 2
  • Ronald Tarigan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiroshi Shimoda
    • 3
  • Tsutomu Omatsu
    • 4
  • Supratikno
    • 2
  • Didik Pramono
    • 2
  • Danang Dwi Cahyadi
    • 2
  • Ryosuke Kobayashi
    • 1
  • Keisuke Iida
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Mizutani
    • 4
  • Ken Maeda
    • 3
  • Srihadi Agungpriyono
    • 2
  • Eiichi Hondo
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of Animal Morphology, Graduate School of Bioagricultural SciencesNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineBogor Agricultural University (IPB)BogorIndonesia
  3. 3.Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary MedicineYamaguchi UniversityYamaguchiJapan
  4. 4.Research and Education Center for Prevention of Global Infectious Diseases of AnimalsTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations