Plant Ecology

, Volume 218, Issue 4, pp 417–431

Both spatiotemporal connectivity and habitat quality limit the immigration of forest plants into wooded corridors

  • Taavi Paal
  • Laura Kütt
  • Kertu Lõhmus
  • Jaan Liira
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11258-017-0700-7

Cite this article as:
Paal, T., Kütt, L., Lõhmus, K. et al. Plant Ecol (2017) 218: 417. doi:10.1007/s11258-017-0700-7

Abstract

Extensive afforestation of agricultural areas has increased the importance of green corridors as a dispersal network. We tested the effect of spatiotemporal connectivity, edge effect and habitat structural quality of wooded corridors on the long-term immigration success of forest specialist plants relative to the performance of forest generalists. In agricultural landscapes of central and southern Estonia, we sampled 28 historically connected and 52 isolated tree lines and alleys with a minimum age of 50 years, and 93 edges of ancient forests. The regional pool of common forest plants was compiled using species’ frequency data in 91 ancient forests. Both landscape connectivity and habitat quality affected the richness of response groups, but specialists and generalists responded to different drivers. Forest specialists required long-term neighbourhoods of ancient forest and benefited from a direct connection between forest and corridor. Habitat generalists reacted positively to the recently modified structure of the landscape. When a corridor was connected to forest, the dual edge in the corridor did not result in an increased negative edge effect on forest specialist arrival. Even if both specialists and generalists required wide corridors with optimum shade, forest specialists also benefited from mature overstorey and outward overhanging branches, whereas forest generalists used disturbance-created microhabitats. We conclude that only wooded corridors with long-term connectivity to seed source forests and widely branched tree canopies will function as a green infrastructure supporting forest-specific biodiversity.

Keywords

Ancient forest species Forest plant dispersal Historical ecology Landscape planning Patch-corridor-matrix system Spatiotemporal ecology 

Supplementary material

11258_2017_700_MOESM1_ESM.docx (983 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 982 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
Estonian Research Council
  • SF0180012s09
Estonian Research Council
  • 7878
Estonian Research Council
  • IUT 20-31
ERA-Net Biodiversa
  • smallFOREST
The European Regional Development Fund
  • The Centre of Excellence Ecolchange

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taavi Paal
    • 1
  • Laura Kütt
    • 1
  • Kertu Lõhmus
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jaan Liira
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Ecology and Earth SciencesUniversity of TartuTartuEstonia
  2. 2.Institute of Biology and Environmental SciencesUniversity of OldenburgOldenburgGermany

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