Changing the Landscape of Social Emotional Learning in Urban Schools: What are We Currently Focusing On and Where Do We Go from Here?

Abstract

This study provides a systematic review of the use of social emotional learning (SEL) interventions in urban schools over the last 20 years. I summarize the types of interventions used and the outcomes examined, and I describe the use of culturally responsive pedagogy as a part of each intervention. The review of the 66 studies revealed that few incorporated culturally responsive strategies, and none addressed racism and the role it can play in student mental well-being. Additionally, few researchers measured multiple categories of fidelity of implementation, and few studies included long-term follow-up results of study outcomes. I discuss recommendations for future research in light of Every Student Succeeds Act policies in support of school-based SEL interventions.

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Barnes, T.N. Changing the Landscape of Social Emotional Learning in Urban Schools: What are We Currently Focusing On and Where Do We Go from Here?. Urban Rev 51, 599–637 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11256-019-00534-1

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Keywords

  • Social emotional learning
  • Urban
  • Culturally responsive pedagogy
  • Literature review