Spiritual Capital in Communities of Color: Religion and Spirituality as Sources of Community Cultural Wealth

Abstract

In this paper, we seek to advance theoretical understanding of how religion, spirituality, and spiritual capital serve as key sources for community cultural wealth (Yosso in Race Ethn Educ 8(1):69–91, 2005), influencing educational opportunity for many students of color. We synthesize existing research to show how religion and spirituality are key sources of the six forms of community cultural wealth originally identified by Yosso, and also function as a seventh form of CCW, “spiritual capital” (Pérez Huber in Harv Educ Rev 79(4):704–730, 2009). We conclude by commenting on the limitations of existing studies, as well as suggestions for future research.

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Park, J.J., Dizon, J.P.M. & Malcolm, M. Spiritual Capital in Communities of Color: Religion and Spirituality as Sources of Community Cultural Wealth. Urban Rev 52, 127–150 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11256-019-00515-4

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Keywords

  • Race
  • Minorities
  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Urban education
  • Parents and families
  • Anti-deficit