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Educating Our Own: The Historical Legacy of HBCUs and Their Relevance for Educating a New Generation of Leaders

Abstract

Providing a brief history of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs)—including how and why they were founded, funding sources and needs over time, and an examination of mission statements—the author considers the relevance of HBCUs in the current twenty-first century context. He makes an argument that the educational opportunities HBCUs offer continue to be strongly needed in the contemporary U.S. economic and sociopolitical climate. Finally, he offers HBCU faculty and administrators some suggestions for consideration as they face significant challenges ahead.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The author would like to express his thanks to Kathleen Edwards for her time and review of this article. Without her gracious edits this work would have not been possible.

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Correspondence to Travis J. Albritton.

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Albritton, T.J. Educating Our Own: The Historical Legacy of HBCUs and Their Relevance for Educating a New Generation of Leaders. Urban Rev 44, 311–331 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11256-012-0202-9

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Keywords

  • HBCU
  • Black history
  • Higher education
  • Racial uplift