The Urban Review

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 90–112 | Cite as

Lift Every Voice and Sing: Faculty of Color Face the Challenges of the Tenure Track

  • Dorothy F. Garrison-Wade
  • Gregory A. Diggs
  • Diane Estrada
  • Rene Galindo
Article

Abstract

This article highlights some of the obstacles facing tenure-track faculty of color in academia. Through the perspective of Critical Race Theory (CRT) and by using a counterstories method, four faculty of color share their experiences as they explore diversity issues through engaging in a 1-year self-study. Findings of this qualitative study provide important insights from the perspectives of faculty of color to address ways in which to identify supports that lever barriers during the tenure process.

Keywords

Faculty of color Obstacles Tenure track Critical race theory Racism Confronting diversity Coping strategies 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy F. Garrison-Wade
    • 1
  • Gregory A. Diggs
    • 1
  • Diane Estrada
    • 1
  • Rene Galindo
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado DenverDenverUSA

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