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Urban Ecosystems

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 145–155 | Cite as

The potential for golf courses to support restoration of biodiversity for BioBanking offsets

  • Shelley BurginEmail author
  • Danny Wotherspoon
Article

Abstract

In golf course development there is frequently remnant vegetation on the areas unused for infrastructure. We propose that these areas, together with a whole range of other reserves including sporting fields, cemeteries, railway reserves and educational facilities may be the source of degraded remnant vegetation and associated open space that could be used to provide offsets for biodiversity. We followed the changes in vertebrate biodiversity with low key alteration to management of the Camden Lakeside Golf Course to assess if such areas had the potential for biodiversity banking offsets. Birds, bats, frogs and reptiles increased in species diversity over time. Frogs and reptiles tended to peak in species numbers during the observational period but bat and bird diversity continued to increase. We concluded that on this ‘island’ within a matrix of urbanisation and cleared agricultural lands without remnant vegetation, observed changes in diversity made such areas potential sites for biodiversity banking offsets.

Keywords

Fauna Habitat Restoration Biodiversity offset Remnant woodland 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Health and ScienceUniversity of Western SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Abel EcologyFaulconbridgeAustralia

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