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Tropical Animal Health and Production

, Volume 50, Issue 7, pp 1499–1507 | Cite as

Effects of replacing fishmeal with black soldier fly larval meal in the diets of grower-finishing guinea fowls reared under tropical conditions

  • P. A. Wallace
  • J. K. Nyameasem
  • G. A. Aboagye
  • S. Affedzie-Obresi
  • K. Nkegbe
  • F. Murray
  • V. Botchway
  • N. Karbo
  • W. Leschen
  • P.-O. Maquart
  • V. Clottey
Regular Articles

Abstract

The study was conducted with the view to determine the impact of replacing fishmeal with black soldier fly larval meal (BSFLM) on growing guinea fowls. BSFLM replaced fishmeal (3% in the control diet) in the ratios of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% to produce six dietary treatments, which were iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous. Two hundred and forty-eight-week old guinea fowls with mean live weight of 273.2 ± 10.9 g were tagged, weighted, and randomly assigned to 24 (6 × 4) floor pens; each pen was treated as a replicate. Feed and water were provided ad libitum during the entire period, which lasted 10 weeks. Feed consumption differed among the treatment groups (P = 0.0072) with the 100% fishmeal diets recording the lowest. Daily gain was significantly (P = 0.009) higher for birds fed high BSFLM diets compared to the control (100% fishmeal diet). The inclusion of BSFLM in the diets elicited positive linear effect on weight gains of the guinea fowls (R2 = 0.91) with increasing concentration resulting in higher live weight gains. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) also differed between treatments (P < 0.05) but similar for the 100% fishmeal (control) and 100% BSFLM diets. Organ and haematopoitic integrity were equally assured regardless of levels of the protein sources fed to the birds. Generally, meats from birds fed 60 to 100% BSFLM and from hens were more acceptable. A study to evaluate the economics of utilising BSFLM in guinea fowl production is recommended.

Keywords

Blood chemistry Carcass Haematology Organoleptic properties Protein 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The project team expresses sincere appreciation to the management and staff of CSIR-Animal Research Institute for the unrestrained access to its facilities, laboratories, logistics and administrative support. Much gratitude is extended to CABI, Ghana for supporting in a variety of ways to make this study run smoothly.

Funding information

EDIF and University of Stirling, UK are profoundly appreciated for funding and also for providing technical support particularly in the area of larvae production.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Wallace
    • 1
  • J. K. Nyameasem
    • 1
  • G. A. Aboagye
    • 1
  • S. Affedzie-Obresi
    • 1
  • K. Nkegbe
    • 1
  • F. Murray
    • 2
  • V. Botchway
    • 1
  • N. Karbo
    • 1
  • W. Leschen
    • 2
  • P.-O. Maquart
    • 2
  • V. Clottey
    • 3
  1. 1.Council for Scientific and Industrial Research—Animal Research InstituteAccraGhana
  2. 2.University of StirlingStirlingUK
  3. 3.CABI-WACAccraGhana

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