Innovation and the regulation of products of agricultural biotechnology in the United States of America

Abstract

The policy of the United States government is to seek regulatory approaches, consistent with applicable laws, that protect health and the environment while reducing unnecessary regulatory burdens and avoiding unjustifiably inhibiting innovation, stigmatizing new technologies, or creating unnecessary trade barriers [Adapted from the National Strategy for Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products, Product of the Emerging Technologies Interagency Policy Coordination Committee’s Biotechnology Working Group (OSTP 2016)]. U.S. agencies are focused on delivering health and environmental protection based on the best available science; establishing transparent, coordinated, predictable, and efficient regulatory practices across agencies; and promoting public confidence in the oversight of the products of biotechnology through clear and transparent public engagement [Adapted from the Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity Report (USDA 2017)]. U.S. agencies that regulate the products of agricultural biotechnology discuss regulatory approaches presented during the June 2018 OECD Conference on Genome Editing Applications in Agriculture, focusing on plants developed using genome editing.

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Correspondence to Sally L. McCammon.

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Disclaimer: Sally L. McCammon is a Science Advisor at BRS, APHIS, USDA. “The Findings and Conclusions in This Preliminary Publication Have Not Been Formally Disseminated by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Should Not Be Construed to Represent Any Agency Determination or Policy”.

Mike Mendelsohn is Chief of the Emerging Technologies Branch in BPPD, OPP, EPA. “The Findings and Conclusions in This Preliminary Publicaton Have Not Been Formally Disseminated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Should Not be Construed to Represent Any Agency Determinations or Policy”.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed and arguments employed in this paper are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the OECD or of the governments of its Member countries.

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McCammon, S.L., Mendelsohn, M. Innovation and the regulation of products of agricultural biotechnology in the United States of America. Transgenic Res 28, 183–186 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11248-019-00150-5

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Keywords

  • Plant breeding innovation
  • Biotechnology regulation
  • Genome editing
  • Genetic engineering
  • Biosafety