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Transgenic Research

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 713–717 | Cite as

A Model Transgenic Cereal Plant with Detoxification Activity for the Estrogenic Mycotoxin Zearalenone

  • Arisa Higa-Nishiyama
  • Naoko Takahashi-Ando
  • Tsutomu Shimizu
  • Toshiaki Kudo
  • Isamu Yamaguchi
  • Makoto KimuraEmail author
Short communication

Abstract

Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic mycotoxin produced by the necrotrophic cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. This mycotoxin is detoxified by ZHD101, a lactonohydrolase from Clonostachys rosea, or EGFP:ZHD101, its fusion to the C-terminus of an enhanced green fluorescence protein. We previously showed that egfp:zhd101 is efficiently expressed in T0 leaves of rice. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of in planta detoxification of the mycotoxin using progeny. When protein extract from T1 leaves was incubated with ZEN, the amount of the toxin decreased significantly as measured by HPLC. ZEN degradation activity was also detected in vivo in transgenic T2 seeds. These results suggest that zhd101 can be exploited as an efficient and cost-effective system for protection of important cereals that are more susceptible to the pathogen (e.g., wheat and maize) from contamination with the estrogenic mycotoxin.

Keywords

detoxifying gene Fusarium head blight of wheat barely and maize genetically modified (GM) cereals lactonohydrolase mycotoxin decontamination 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arisa Higa-Nishiyama
    • 1
  • Naoko Takahashi-Ando
    • 1
  • Tsutomu Shimizu
    • 2
  • Toshiaki Kudo
    • 3
  • Isamu Yamaguchi
    • 1
    • 4
  • Makoto Kimura
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory for Remediation Research, Plant Science CenterRIKENKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Life Science Research InstituteKumiai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.ShizuokaJapan
  3. 3.Environmental Molecular Biology LaboratoryRIKENSaitamaJapan
  4. 4.Laboratory for Adaptation and Resistance, Plant Science CenterRIKENKanagawaJapan

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