What’s wrong with contemporary philosophy?

Abstract

Philosophy in the West divides into three parts: Analytic Philosophy (AP), Continental Philosophy (CP), and History of Philosophy (HP). But all three parts are in a bad way. AP is sceptical about the claim that philosophy can be a science, and hence is uninterested in the real world. CP is never pursued in a properly theoretical way, and its practice is tailor-made for particular political and ethical conclusions. HP is mostly developed on a regionalist basis: what is studied is determined by the nation or culture to which a philosopher belongs, rather than by the objective value of that philosopher’s work. Progress in philosophy can only be attained by avoiding these pitfalls.

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Correspondence to Kevin Mulligan.

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Mulligan, K., Simons, P. & Smith, B. What’s wrong with contemporary philosophy?. Topoi 25, 63–67 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11245-006-0023-0

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Keywords

  • analytic philosophy
  • continental philosophy
  • history of philosophy
  • horror mundi