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Constitutive overexpression of Nicotiana GA 2 ox leads to compact phenotypes and delayed flowering in Kalanchoë blossfeldiana and Petunia hybrida

Abstract

This work describes compact phenotypes of Kalanchoë blossfeldiana and Petunia hybrida plants harboring a constitutively overexpressed gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA 2 ox) transgene. A GA 2 ox gene from Nicotiana tabacum under the control of the Ca35S promoter was introduced into the pCAMBIA1303 plasmid. The cloning vector was introduced into leaf explants of Kalanchoë and Petunia via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Putative transformants were analysed for the presence, integration and expression of the transgene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR, and Southern blot analysis, respectively. Phenotypic evaluations revealed that the mean lengths of the Kalanchoë transgenic lines were two-fold shorter than those of wild-type control plants, although the mean numbers of nodes were similar. Moreover, the mean lengths of inflorescence stems of the Kalanchoë transgenic lines were almost three-fold shorter than those of the wild-type control plants. Similarly, the mean lengths of Petunia transgenic lines were four-fold shorter than those of the wild-type plants, except for a single line, while the mean numbers of nodes were either similar or higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type control plants. In transgenic lines of both Kalanchoë and Petunia, delayed flowering was observed with a mean of 24 days for Kalanchoë and a range of three to 12 days for Petunia. Although the flower morphology of the transgenic lines did not exhibit any differences from their respective wild-type control plants, transgenic lines of both species exhibited darker green pigmented leaves containing an approximately two-fold increase in chlorophyll contents over the wild-type control plants.

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Web References

  1. http://www.cambia.org/daisy/cambia/2048/version/1/part/4/data/pCAMBIA1303.pdf?branch=main&language=default

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Prof. em. Bjarne M. Stummann, the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, for his valuable advice and critical review of the manuscript. This project was supported by a PhD research grant from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) (Ref.: 323, PKZ: A/06/07504), which is gratefully acknowledged.

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Correspondence to J. M. Gargul.

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Gargul, J.M., Mibus, H. & Serek, M. Constitutive overexpression of Nicotiana GA 2 ox leads to compact phenotypes and delayed flowering in Kalanchoë blossfeldiana and Petunia hybrida . Plant Cell Tiss Organ Cult 115, 407–418 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11240-013-0372-5

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Keywords

  • Compact growth
  • GA 2 ox
  • Gibberellin 2-oxidase
  • Ornamental plants
  • Transgenic plants