A microspore embryogenesis protocol for Camelina sativa, a multi-use crop

An Erratum to this article was published on 13 September 2011

Abstract

Camelina [Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz], a member of the Brassicaceae family, has a unique oil profile that has potential both for biofuels and as a food crop. It is essential to have a doubled haploidy protocol in order to enhance breeding of this crop for prairie conditions as well as improve the yield and quality characteristics. Microspore-derived embryos have been produced from Camelina sativa. Buds 1–3 mm in length were selected for culture. The microspores were isolated and purified in full-strength B5 extraction medium and cultured in NLN medium with 12.5% sucrose and 12.5% polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) without glutamine, at a density of 10,000 microspores per mL. Glutamine was added to the cultures 72 h after extraction to give a final concentration of 0.8 g/L. The microspore cultures were maintained at 24°C in the dark. After 28 days embryos were observed and these were regenerated to plants and selfed seed was produced. The highest embryogenic frequency achieved was 38 microspore-derived embryos from 100,000 microspores.

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Correspondence to A. M. R. Ferrie.

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An erratum to this article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11240-011-0025-5

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Ferrie, A.M.R., Bethune, T.D. A microspore embryogenesis protocol for Camelina sativa, a multi-use crop. Plant Cell Tiss Organ Cult 106, 495–501 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11240-011-9948-0

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Keywords

  • Camelina sativa
  • Doubled haploidy
  • Haploids
  • Microspore culture
  • Microspore embryogenesis