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How does it feel to become a teacher? Emotions in teacher education

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Abstract

Academic emotions are central ingredients in student teachers’ learning. They have been shown to affect cognitive performance, motivation and achievement (e.g. Linnenbrink-Garcia et al. in Contemp Educ Psychol 36(1):13–24, 2011). However, until recently the role of emotions in student teachers’ learning has largely been neglected (e.g. Ketonen and Lonka in Proc Soc Behav Sci 69(24):1901–1910, 2012). The study focused on exploring the spectrum of academic emotions experienced by 19 student teachers in different academic activities. The results showed that student teachers experience a wide variety of emotions during their studies. A total of 18 different positive emotions and 20 different negative emotions were reported. They explicated more positive than negative emotions. Further investigations showed that student teachers reported more emotional experiences embedded in individual activities than in social activities. The results implied that the spectrum of academic emotions experienced by student teachers is wider than previous literature suggests, and that student teachers experience a wide range of academic emotions in various academic activities provided by teacher education.

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Anttila, H., Pyhältö, K., Soini, T. et al. How does it feel to become a teacher? Emotions in teacher education. Soc Psychol Educ 19, 451–473 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-016-9335-0

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