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Islamic Education and the UK Muslims: Options and Expectations in a Context of Multi-locationality

Abstract

The article will discuss Islamic philosophy of education to explain the role and aims of education for the Muslim Ummah (Community). It will then debate the needs of the UK Muslims with regard to the education of their children in the context of multi-locationality, and associated challenges of bringing up children while living between two different ‘ways of life’. How their concerns shape their expectations from education in the UK and their educational choices, will be argued while drawing on relevant literature and research, followed by some suggestions to inform future policy regarding education of the UK Muslims.

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Acknowledgments

This article was completed during my study leave (January–June 2012). I thank Professor Janet Ainley, Director School of Education, Professor Elizabeth Murphy Head of College of Social Sciences and Pro-Vice Chancellor, and Professor Mark Thompson, the Chair of the Staffing Committee for approving my study leave which enabled me to work on this article, among other outputs. Special thanks go to colleagues, who covered my work during this study leave.

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Correspondence to Saeeda Shah.

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Shah, S. Islamic Education and the UK Muslims: Options and Expectations in a Context of Multi-locationality. Stud Philos Educ 33, 233–249 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11217-013-9391-2

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Keywords

  • Muslim learners
  • Multi-locationality
  • Education
  • Islamic philosophy of education