Social Justice Research

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 39–62 | Cite as

Perceptions of global inequality: a call for research

  • Joan Toms Olson
Article

Abstract

In light of media attention to and growing public awareness of the globalizing economy, a case for the expanded empirical investigation of public perceptions of international income distribution and inequality is presented. Theoretical issues to be illuminated by such studies are considered; exploratory qualitative data are provided to illustrate the rich potential of such research; and a variety of issues that must be addressed when conducting future research in this area are reviewed.

Key words

distributive justice international relations justice evaluations social inequality social perception 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan Toms Olson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyMary Washington CollegeFredricksburg

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