Employment Flexibility and Job Security as Determinants of Job Satisfaction: The Case of Polish Knowledge Workers

Abstract

A number of empirical studies have shown a positive influence of employment stability on job satisfaction. Employment stability, usually measured by the type of contract an individual has, may affect one’s job satisfaction directly, as well as through its impact on other relative variables, such as job security, since a stable position seems to bring individuals a sense of security. The aim of our research is to investigate the relationships between job security, employment stability and job satisfaction of workers in Poland. In the study, we strive to show how these factors impact knowledge workers and other workers differently. In order to conduct analysis, we propose two logistic models, separate for these two groups, with job satisfaction as a dependent variable and type of contract and three items denoting different dimensions of job insecurity: an insecure source of income, too many duties to cope with and being treated unjustly at the workplace, as independent variables. The robustness of the models has been defended by the introduction of the time dimension. The results show that job insecurity is the most influential factor in the model of job satisfaction for all employees. However, this impact differs depending on the employment arrangements. Flexible workers are much more vulnerable to job insecurities in terms of job satisfaction. Another finding is that the job satisfaction of knowledge workers is more influenced by job security.

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Correspondence to Aleksandra Wilczyńska.

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Wilczyńska, A., Batorski, D. & Sellens, J.T. Employment Flexibility and Job Security as Determinants of Job Satisfaction: The Case of Polish Knowledge Workers. Soc Indic Res 126, 633–656 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-015-0909-6

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Keywords

  • Knowledge workers
  • Job satisfaction
  • Employment flexibility
  • Job security
  • Flexicurity
  • Poland