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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 125, Issue 1, pp 243–255 | Cite as

A Wellbeing Approach to Mobility and its Application to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

  • Alfred Michael DockeryEmail author
Article

Abstract

This paper demonstrates that key models of human mobility across several disciplines can be considered as specific cases of a broader conceptualisation of mobility in terms of its contribution to wellbeing. It is argued that this wellbeing perspective offers important advantages for the formulation of policy in areas that must respond to mobility in cross-cultural contexts, and particularly in regard to policy relating to highly mobile, indigenous peoples. An applied example is provided through a discussion of how this conceptualisation of mobility offers a different understanding of the mobility of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, one that may have led to superior policy outcomes.

Keywords

Mobility Wellbeing First Nations Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Indigenous Australia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation, Curtin Business SchoolCurtin UniversityPerthAustralia

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