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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 116, Issue 3, pp 843–852 | Cite as

The Role of Emotional Intelligence in the Impact of Mindfulness on Life Satisfaction and Mental Distress

  • Yu Wang
  • Feng KongEmail author
Article

Abstract

The present study tested the mediating role of emotional intelligence in the impact of mindfulness on life satisfaction and mental distress in a sample of Chinese adults and the widespread or limited mediators between the different groups in demographic factors, e.g., gender, students and non-students. Three hundred and twenty-one participants completed the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire. Path analysis showed that emotional intelligence mediated partially the impact of mindfulness on life satisfaction and mental distress. Moreover, multi-group analyses indicated that no significant path in the final model differed by gender, but non-students with high levels of mindfulness are more likely to perceive greater life satisfaction than students. The findings corroborate an important role for emotional intelligence in mindfulness exerting its beneficial effects.

Keywords

Mindfulness Emotional intelligence Life satisfaction Mental distress 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special EducationAnshun UniversityAnshunChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and LearningBeijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina

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