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Effects of Internet Connectedness and Information Literacy on Quality of Life

Abstract

The goal of this exploratory research is to examine the inter-linkage among Internet connectedness, information literacy, and quality of life. Results from a telephone survey, based on a probability sample of 756 Internet users, found that Internet connectedness is not related to quality of life. However, there is a significant relationship between Internet connectedness and information literacy, and a strong link between information literacy and life quality. These findings encourage further exploration of life quality that underlies the concepts of Internet connectedness and information literacy. The hope is that additional discoveries will aid curriculum design, both at the K-12 and university levels, and the future development of Internet applications and services so as to enhance overall life quality. In particular, the intent of the study was to determine what factors might have the most positive effect on quality of life.

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Correspondence to Louis Leung.

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Leung, L. Effects of Internet Connectedness and Information Literacy on Quality of Life. Soc Indic Res 98, 273–290 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-009-9539-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-009-9539-1

Keywords

  • Internet connectedness
  • Information literacy
  • Quality of life (QoL)