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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 88, Issue 1, pp 131–145 | Cite as

Temporary Work in Transnational Labor Regulation: SER-Centrism and the Risk of Exacerbating Gendered Precariousness

  • Leah F. VoskoEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article explores the transnational regulation of temporary work. Analyzing the terms of the EU Directive on Fixed-Term Work (1999), the ILO Convention on Private Employment Agencies (1997), the ILO Recommendation on the Employment Relationship (2006), and a draft EU Directive on Temporary Agency Work under negotiation, it demonstrates that these regulations hinge on the gendered norm of the standard employment relationship (SER) or the full-time permanent job complete with a social wage. They pursue labor protections designed to stretch the employment norm. To the extent that this “SER-centric” approach alleviates precariousness, it is most likely to help workers in forms of employment closely resembling the SER (i.e., fixed-term workers) and least likely to improve the situations of those that are most precarious (i.e., temporary agency workers).

Keywords

Temporary employment Gender International labor regulation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research for this article was made possible by a standard research grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (grant no. 410-2006-2361) and the Canada Research Chairs Program. I am grateful to the two anonymous reviewers for their comments as well as to Gerald Kernerman, Stephen McBride, Paul Bowles and Fiona McPhail for their feedback on earlier versions of the article, and to Jeff Butler for his able research assistance. I completed this article as a Visiting Fellow at the International Gender Studies Institute, Queen Elizabeth House, the University of Oxford.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.York UniversityTorontoCanada

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