Sex Roles

, Volume 75, Issue 7–8, pp 377–392

The Double Standard at Sexual Debut: Gender, Sexual Behavior and Adolescent Peer Acceptance

  • Derek A. Kreager
  • Jeremy Staff
  • Robin Gauthier
  • Eva S. Lefkowitz
  • Mark E. Feinberg
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11199-016-0618-x

Cite this article as:
Kreager, D.A., Staff, J., Gauthier, R. et al. Sex Roles (2016) 75: 377. doi:10.1007/s11199-016-0618-x

Abstract

A sexual double standard in adolescence has important implications for sexual development and gender inequality. The present study uses longitudinal social network data (N = 914; 11–16 years of age) to test if gender moderates associations between adolescents’ sexual behaviors and peer acceptance. Consistent with a traditional sexual double standard, female adolescents who reported having sex had significant decreases in peer acceptance over time, whereas male adolescents reporting the same behavior had significant increases in peer acceptance. This pattern was observed net of respondents’ own perceived friendships, further suggesting that the social responses to sex vary by gender of the sexual actor. However, findings for “making out” showed a reverse double standard, such that female adolescents reporting this behavior had increases in peer acceptance and male adolescents reporting the same behavior had decreases in peer acceptance over time. Results thus suggest that peers enforce traditional sexual scripts for both “heavy” and “light” sexual behaviors during adolescence. These findings have important implications for sexual health education, encouraging educators to develop curricula that emphasize the gendered social construction of sexuality and to combat inequitable and stigmatizing peer responses to real or perceived deviations from traditional sexual scripts.

Keywords

Sexual double standard Gender norms Adolescence Social networks Sexual activity 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
William T. Grant Foundation
  • 8316
National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • R01-DA08225
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
  • 2 R24-HD041025
National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • R01-DA013709

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derek A. Kreager
    • 1
  • Jeremy Staff
    • 1
  • Robin Gauthier
    • 2
  • Eva S. Lefkowitz
    • 3
  • Mark E. Feinberg
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and CriminologyPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  3. 3.Human Development and Family StudiesPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  4. 4.Prevention Research CenterPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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