Single-Sex Education: New Perspectives and Evidence on a Continuing Controversy

Abstract

The number of single-sex schools in the United States has climbed steadily in recent years, despite a lack of consensus that such schools lead to academic or psychological outcomes superior to those of coeducational schools. In this introduction to the first part of a special issue on the topic, we review the history of single-sex education in the U.S. and factors that have led to its recent rise. We then review ideological and methodological controversies in the field. Finally, we summarize the eight empirical studies that appear in the issue, highlighting the contributions of each paper to a body of work that we hope will inform educational practice and policy.

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Bigler, R.S., Signorella, M.L. Single-Sex Education: New Perspectives and Evidence on a Continuing Controversy. Sex Roles 65, 659 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-011-0046-x

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Keywords

  • Single-sex education
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Achievement
  • Social development