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Relationships between Separate and Connected Knowing and Approaches to Learning

Abstract

This study explored whether connected and separate ways of knowing were related to deep and achieving approaches to learning in a sample of White/Caucasian and Mexican-American community college students in the Southwestern and Midwestern United States. Two hundred forty-one students (72 men and 169 women) completed the Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Survey (ATTLS) and the Shortened Study Process Questionnaire (SSPQ). No significant differences in separate (SK) and connected knowing (CK) were found between White and Mexican-American students. However, men scored higher than women on separate knowing (SK) and lower on connected knowing (CK). In addition, both CK and SK were significantly related to a deep approach to learning; only CK was significantly related to achieving approach.

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Correspondence to Heath Marrs.

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Marrs, H., Benton, S.L. Relationships between Separate and Connected Knowing and Approaches to Learning. Sex Roles 60, 57–66 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-008-9510-7

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Keywords

  • Personal epistemology
  • Ways of knowing
  • Connected and separate knowing
  • Gender
  • Approaches to learning