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The Effect of Sport Commentator Framing on Viewer Attitudes

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Abstract

An experimental analysis was conducted to determine the effects of involvement, commentator framing, and gender on viewer attitudes toward female athletes. The sample was comprised of 112 students at a mid-western university in the United States. Hypotheses and research questions were tested through a 2 × 3 multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results indicated the overall MANCOVA was significant. Involvement was positively related to viewer attitudes’ towards the dependent variables and explained 27.8% of the variance. Gender explained 39.3% of the variance in attitudes as male viewers had significantly lower mean scores on all dependent variables. Male viewers had significantly lower scores than female viewers in the positive framing condition; the interaction explained 8% of the variance in viewers’ perceptions of respectability of female athletes.

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Correspondence to Janet S. Fink.

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Parker, H.M., Fink, J.S. The Effect of Sport Commentator Framing on Viewer Attitudes. Sex Roles 58, 116–126 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9344-8

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