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What Good is a Feminist Identity?: Women’s Feminist Identification and Role Expectations for Intimate and Sexual Relationships

Abstract

Women’s feminist identification is associated with a growing list of favorable outcomes, predicting that these correlations will extend to egalitarian and assertive role expectations for committed and sexual partnerships, respectively. Surveying 165 undergraduate US women, nonfeminist passive acceptance was linked to low egalitarian expectations overall and across all seven subscales of the marriage role expectation inventory. It also was related to depressed sexual assertiveness overall and specifically in initiating sexual encounters and engaging in safe sexual practices. These negative associations were nonsignificant or positive for women with stronger feminist identification. When endorsement of passive acceptance was controlled for, the positive correlation between egalitarian and assertive expectations fell to nonsignificance, consistent with regarding nonfeminist attitudes as a confounded third common factor.

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Acknowledgement

The authors thank Marie Bozin and Jessica Christopher for their help with data collection, and Andrea Snell and John Zipp for their generous sharing of their statistical expertise.

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Correspondence to Janice D. Yoder.

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Yoder, J.D., Perry, R.L. & Saal, E.I. What Good is a Feminist Identity?: Women’s Feminist Identification and Role Expectations for Intimate and Sexual Relationships. Sex Roles 57, 365–372 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9269-2

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Keywords

  • Feminism
  • Female attitudes
  • Sex roles
  • Interpersonal relationships
  • Sexuality