Sex Roles

, Volume 55, Issue 11–12, pp 869–874 | Cite as

Body on My Mind: The Lingering Effect of State Self-objectification

  • Diane M. Quinn
  • Rachel W. Kallen
  • Christie Cathey
Original Article

Abstract

Objectification theory explicates a model in which women are socialized to view their own bodies as objects to be evaluated. In the current study, we used a 2 (self-objectification condition: swimsuit versus sweater) × 2 (gender) factorial design to examine whether body-related thoughts continued after women were removed from a self-objectifying situation. Results showed that, compared to participants in the other three groups, women in the self-objectification condition listed more body-related thoughts during a free response task given after they had re-dressed. The amount of shame experienced during self-objectification mediated the relationship between self-objectification condition and lingering body-related thoughts. This study adds to the understanding of how the process of self-objectification works to maintain women’s focus on their appearance.

Keywords

Objectification Gender Body image Shame 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane M. Quinn
    • 1
  • Rachel W. Kallen
    • 2
  • Christie Cathey
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, Purchase CollegeState University of New YorkPurchaseUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyMissouri Southern State CollegeJoplinUSA

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