Sex Roles

, 54:377 | Cite as

From “It’s All in Your Head ” to “Taking Back the Month”: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Research and the Contributions of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research

Original Paper

Abstract

Our understanding of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) as a cultural entity and a medical concern has developed from different disciplines and represents a range of intellectual approaches to a complex, ill-understood phenomenon. Unfortunately, there has been little interaction among the disciplines at an integrative level of research, outside of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research (SMCR) conferences and publications. This paper chronicles the history of PMS research, which began in mid-19th century America, and focuses on the contributions from the SMCR conferences that brought together scholars, clinicians, scientists, and women’s health advocates from across disciplines and nations to advance a multidisciplinary research agenda and the knowledge of perimenstrual experiences and syndromes.

Keywords

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) Society for menstrual cycle research Integrative research review Historical review 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of NursingUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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