Fake news and indifference to scientific fact: President Trump’s confused tweets on global warming, climate change and weather

Abstract

A set of 115 tweets on climate change by President Trump, from 2011 to 2015, are analysed by means of the data mining technique, sentiment analysis. The intention is to explore the contents and sentiments of the messages contained, the degree to which they differ, and their implications about his understanding of climate change. The results suggest a predominantly negative emotion in relation to tweets on climate change, but they appear to lack a clear logical framework, and confuse short term variations in localised weather with long term global average climate change.

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References

  1. De Vries, A. (2012). Sentiment Package, available at https://github.com/andrie/sentiment/blob/master/DESCRIPTION.

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Acknowledgements

For financial support, the first author acknowledges the Australian Research Council, and the second author is most grateful to the Australian Research Council, National Science Council, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Taiwan, and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

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Correspondence to Michael McAleer.

Additional information

The analysis in the paper was undertaken with the R sentiment package.

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Allen, D.E., McAleer, M. Fake news and indifference to scientific fact: President Trump’s confused tweets on global warming, climate change and weather. Scientometrics 117, 625–629 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-018-2847-y

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Keywords

  • Sentiment analysis
  • Polarity
  • Climate change
  • Scientific verification
  • Weather

JEL Classification

  • A1
  • C88
  • C44
  • Z0