Structure and evolution of innovation research in the last 60 years: review and future trends in the field of business through the citations and co-citations analysis

  • Dennys Eduardo Rossetto
  • Roberto Carlos Bernardes
  • Felipe Mendes Borini
  • Cristiane Chaves Gattaz
Article
  • 75 Downloads

Abstract

The field of innovation studies has grown considerably in the last four decades, which has led to the emergence of new approaches and theoretical aspects that need to be examined and considered. Therefore, this paper aims to understand what are the main theoretical pillars that support the structure of innovation theories and fields, how it evolved over the years and what are the directions that lead to future trends in innovation research. The procedure consists in a mix-methods using the citation and co-citation analysis associated with bibliometric methods, Social Network Analysis, and a systematic review of the literature. The results were validated by Delphi with academic specialists in innovation. Considering publications between 1956 and 2016 divided into four 15-years timespan, the longitudinal analysis results indicate the evolution of the main streams of thoughts that support the current innovation research fields and depict a research orientation for future works that can be developed to generate relevant contributions for the theoretical development of the area. This paper differentiates itself bringing results based on a large database, by the research methods employed, and by the perspective adopted provides solid contributions to the understanding of the past, present, and future of the scientific research in innovation to business administration field.

Keywords

Bibliometrics Innovation Social network analysis Systematic literature review Co-citation analysis Citation analysis 

Mathematics Subject Classification

91D30 

JEL Classification

030 032 C38 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank all reviewers and people who contributed with their suggestions and feedbacks. I gratefully acknowledge the support and generosity of the National Council for the Improvement of Higher Education—CAPES from the Brazilian Ministry of Education (Grant No. 021.535.379-08/2014-2017, and Grant No. 88881.131969/2016-01), without which the present study could not have been completed.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Business AdministrationUniversity of Texas at El Paso – UTEPEl PasoUSA
  2. 2.International Business SchoolEscola Superior de Propaganda e Marketing – ESPMSão PauloBrazil
  3. 3.Department of Business AdministrationThe University Center of FEISão PauloBrazil
  4. 4.IC2 InstituteUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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