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Facebook in educational research: a bibliometric analysis

Abstract

Facebook has become the object of research in different areas. The present study presents a bibliometric analysis of the scientific literature related to the use of this social network in educational research. To this end, bibliometric techniques were applied in the analysis of scientific articles indexed at the Web of Science Core Collection, from Thomson Reuters, and linked to the research areas of Education/Educational Research. This resulted in the identification of, among others, developments in scientific production, the most important journals that publish papers on the topic, the main authors and the main articles published in the area. The results indicate the growth of scientific production in the area from 2008 onwards, pointing to Computers and Education as the most relevant journal by number of publications (22) and impact factor and indicate that authors from the United States, Australia, Taiwan, United Kingdom and South Africa stand out in the construction of knowledge on educational research applying Facebook. Moreover, the ego-network of the Educational Research area shows that this area coexists with other areas of knowledge in the use of social networking, such as Computer Science, Linguistics and Health Sciences, indicating an interdisciplinary and transversal nature in different areas of research.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank CNPq, CAPES and FAPERJ for their support through funding and scholarships.

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Renato Matos Lopes.

Appendix

Appendix

Articles Inserted For Bibliometric Analysis (n = 208)

  1. 1.

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    VICO, A. (1988). Perceived Social Support as a Factor of Rural Women’s Digital Inclusion in Online Social Networks. MEDIA EDUCATION RESEARCH JOURNAL, 173.

  195. 195.

    Vincent, A. H., & Weber, Z. A. (2014). An Elective Course on Current Concepts in Adult Ambulatory Care. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 78(10).

  196. 196.

    Walton, E., & Rusznyak, L. (2013). Pre-service teachers’ pedagogical learning during practicum placements in special schools. Teaching and Teacher Education, 36, 112–120.

  197. 197.

    Walton, J. M., White, J., & Ross, S. (2015). What’s on YOUR Facebook profile? Evaluation of an educational intervention to promote appropriate use of privacy settings by medical students on social networking sites. Medical education online, 20.

  198. 198.

    Wang, Q., Woo, H. L., Quek, C. L., Yang, Y., & Liu, M. (2012). Using the Facebook group as a learning management system: An exploratory study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 43(3), 428–438.

  199. 199.

    Watson, A. P., & Hugo, W. (2015). Adolescent literacies: Chatting and learning across different planes of composition. Education as Change, 19(1), 120–147.

  200. 200.

    Watson, B., Cooke, M., & Walker, R. (2016). Using Facebook to enhance commencing student confidence in clinical skill development: A phenomenological hermeneutic study. Nurse education today, 36, 64–69.

  201. 201.

    Wood, E., Zivcakova, L., Gentile, P., Archer, K., De Pasquale, D., & Nosko, A. (2012). Examining the impact of off-task multi-tasking with technology on real-time classroom learning. Computers & Education, 58(1), 365–374.

  202. 202.

    Wu, S. Y., Hou, H. T., Hwang, W. Y., & Liu, E. Z. F. (2013). Analysis of learning behavior in problem-solving-based and project-based discussion activities within the seamless online learning integrated discussion (SOLID) system. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 49(1), 61–82.

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    Wu WH, Yan WC, Wang WY, et al. Comparison of varied social media in assisting student learning. Int J Eng Educ. 2015;31:567–573.

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    Yazan, B. (2015). Adhering to the language roots: Ottoman Turkish campaigns on Facebook. Language Policy, 14(4), 335–355.

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    Yen, Y. C., Hou, H. T., & Chang, K. E. (2015). Applying role-playing strategy to enhance learners’ writing and speaking skills in EFL courses using Facebook and Skype as learning tools: a case study in Taiwan. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 28(5), 383–406.

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    Yoo, S. J., & Huang, W. H. D. (2011). Comparison of Web 2.0 Technology Acceptance Level based on Cultural Differences. Educational technology & society, 14(4), 241–252.

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    Yu, A. Y., Tian, S. W., Vogel, D., & Kwok, R. C. W. (2010). Can learning be virtually boosted? An investigation of online social networking impacts. Computers & Education, 55(4), 1494–1503.

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    Zawacki-Richter, O. (2015). Media usage patterns in higher education. ZEITSdCHRIFT FUR ERZIEHUNGSWISSENSCHAFT, 18(3), 527–549.

Excluded Articles From Bibliometric Analysis (n = 52)

  1. 1.

    Adami, E. (2012). The rhetoric of the implicit and the politics of representation in the age of copy-and-paste. Learning, Media and Technology, 37(2), 131–144.

  2. 2.

    Almanza, A., Fonseca, O., & Castillo, A. (2013). Social Networks and Young People. Comparative Study of Facebook between Colombia and Spain/Redes sociales y jóvenes. Uso de Facebook en la juventud colombiana y española.Comunicar, 20(40), 127.

  3. 3.

    Bauman, S., & Baldasare, A. (2015). Cyber Aggression Among College Students: Demographic Differences, Predictors of Distress, and the Role of the University. Journal of College Student Development, 56(4), 317–330.

  4. 4.

    Birnbaum, M. G. (2013). The fronts students use: Facebook and the standardization of self-presentations. Journal of College Student Development, 54(2), 155–171.

  5. 5.

    Blessing, S. B., Blessing, J. S., & Fleck, B. K. (2012). Using Twitter to reinforce classroom concepts. Teaching of Psychology, 39(4), 268–271.

  6. 6.

    Blumenreich, M., & Jaffe-Walter, R. (2015). Social media illuminates some truths about school reform. Phi Delta Kappan, 97(1), 25–28.

  7. 7.

    Bourgeois, A., Bower, J., & Carroll, A. (2014). Social Networking and the Social and Emotional Wellbeing of Adolescents in Australia. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 24(02), 167–182.

  8. 8.

    Cabalin, C. (2014). Online and Mobilized Students: The Use of Facebook in the Chilean Student Protests/Estudiantes conectados y movilizados: El uso de Facebook en las protestas estudiantiles en Chile. Comunicar, 22(43), 25.

  9. 9.

    Çam, E., & Isbulan, O. (2012). A New Addiction for Teacher Candidates: Social Networks. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology-TOJET,11(3), 14–19.

  10. 10.

    Cassidy, W., Brown, K., & Jackson, M. (2012). “Making Kind Cool”: Parents’ Suggestions for Preventing Cyber Bullying and Fostering Cyber Kindness.Journal of Educational Computing Research, 46(4), 415–436.

  11. 11.

    CONDEZA, R., BACHMANN, I., & MUJICA, C. News Consumption among Chilean Adolescents: Interests, Motivations and Perceptions on the News Agenda.

  12. 12.

    Duenas i Cid, D. (2016, July). Discriminatory Expressions, the Young and Social Networks: The Effect of Gender. In Third ISA Forum of Sociology (July 10–14, 2016). Isaconf.

  13. 13.

    Forgasz, H., Leder, G., & Tan, H. (2014). Public views on the gendering of mathematics and related careers: International comparisons. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(3), 369–388.

  14. 14.

    Foley, Niamh M., Bridget M. Maher, and Mark A. Corrigan. “Social Media and Tomorrow’s Medical Students—How Do They Fit?.” Journal of surgical education 71.3 (2014): 385–390.

  15. 15.

    Go, P. H., Klaassen, Z., & Chamberlain, R. S. (2012). Attitudes and practices of surgery residency program directors toward the use of social networking profiles to select residency candidates: a nationwide survey analysis. Journal of surgical education, 69(3), 292–300.

  16. 16.

    Frost, M. (2014). The Grief Grapevine: Facebook Memorial Pages and Adolescent Bereavement. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling,24(02), 256–265.

  17. 17.

    Go, P. H., Klaassen, Z., & Chamberlain, R. S. (2012). Attitudes and practices of surgery residency program directors toward the use of social networking profiles to select residency candidates: a nationwide survey analysis. Journal of surgical education, 69(3), 292–300.

  18. 18.

    Gray, Rebecca, et al. “Examining social adjustment to college in the age of social media: Factors influencing successful transitions and persistence.”Computers & Education 67 (2013): 193–207.

  19. 19.

    Hall, M., Hanna, L. A., & Huey, G. (2013). Use and views on social networking sites of pharmacy students in the United Kingdom. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 77(1), 9.

  20. 20.

    Hendus, U. (2015). “See Translation”: explicit and implicit language policies on Facebook. Language Policy, 14(4), 397–417.

  21. 21.

    Junco, R. (2014). iSpy: seeing what students really do online. Learning, Media and Technology, 39(1), 75–89.

  22. 22.

    Linne, J. (2014). Common uses of Facebook among adolescents from different social sectors in Buenos Aires City. Comunicar, 22(43), 189–197.

  23. 23.

    Mazer, J. P., Murphy, R. E., & Simonds, C. J. (2009). The effects of teacher self‐disclosure via Facebook on teacher credibility. Learning, Media and Technology, 34(2), 175–183.

  24. 24.

    McLean, C. A. (2010). A space called home: An immigrant adolescent’s digital literacy practices. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 54(1), 13.

  25. 25.

    Moreno, M. A., Grant, A., Kacvinsky, L., Egan, K. G., & Fleming, M. F. (2012). College students’ alcohol displays on Facebook: Intervention considerations. Journal of American College Health, 60(5), 388–394.

  26. 26.

    Pellegrino, K., Sweet, B., Kastner, J. D., Russell, H. A., & Reese, J. (2014). Becoming music teacher educators: Learning from and with each other in a professional development community. International Journal of Music Education, 32(4), 462–477.

  27. 27.

    Phyak, P. (2015). (En) Countering language ideologies: language policing in the ideospace of Facebook. Language Policy, 14(4), 377–395.

  28. 28.

    Ponce, B. A., Determann, J. R., Boohaker, H. A., Sheppard, E., McGwin, G., & Theiss, S. (2013). Social networking profiles and professionalism issues in residency applicants: an original study-cohort study. Journal of surgical education, 70(4), 502–507.

  29. 29.

    Raacke, J., & Bonds-Raacke, J. (2015). Are students really connected? Predicting college adjustment from social network usage. Educational Psychology, 35(7), 819–834.

  30. 30.

    Ramírez-Vélez, R., Bagur-Calafat, M. C., Correa-Bautista, J. E., & Girabent-Farrés, M. (2015). Barriers against incorporating evidence-based practice in physical therapy in Colombia: current state and factors associated. BMC medical education, 15(1), 1.

  31. 31.

    Rice, E., Tulbert, E., Cederbaum, J., Adhikari, A. B., & Milburn, N. G. (2012). Mobilizing homeless youth for HIV prevention: a social network analysis of the acceptability of a face-to-face and online social networking intervention.Health education research, 27(2), 226–236.

  32. 32.

    Ross, S., Lai, K., Walton, J. M., Kirwan, P., & White, J. S. (2013). “I have the right to a private life”: Medical students’ views about professionalism in a digital world. Medical teacher, 35(10), 826–831.

  33. 33.

    Selwyn, N., & Gorard, S. (2016). Students’ use of Wikipedia as an academic resource—Patterns of use and perceptions of usefulness. The Internet and Higher Education, 28, 28–34.

  34. 34.

    Shafie, L. A., Yaacob, A., & Karpal Singh, P. K. A. (2015). The Roles of English Language and Imagined Communities of a Facebook Group.International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning, 10(6).

  35. 35.

    Sherman, T., & Švelch, J. (2015). “Grammar Nazis never sleep”: Facebook humor and the management of standard written language. Language Policy,14(4), 315–334.

  36. 36.

    Straubhaar, R. (2015). The methodological benefits of social media:“studying up” in Brazil in the Facebook age. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 28(9), 1081–1096.

  37. 37.

    Subramanian, M. (2013). Gossip, drama, and technology: how South Asian American young women negotiate gender on and offline. Gender and Education, 25(3), 311–324.

  38. 38.

    Sultana, S. (2014). Young adults’ linguistic manipulation of English in Bangla in Bangladesh. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism,17(1), 74–89.

  39. 39.

    Swindle, T. M., Ward, W. L., Whiteside-Mansell, L., Bokony, P., & Pettit, D. (2014). Technology use and interest among low-income parents of young children: Differences by age group and ethnicity. Journal of nutrition education and behavior, 46(6), 484–490.

  40. 40.

    Tello, L. (2013). Intimacy and «Extimacy» in Social Net-works. Ethical Boundaries of Facebook. Comunicar, 21(41), 205–213.

  41. 41.

    Teo, T., & Jarupunphol, P. (2015). Dhammic Technology Acceptance Model (DTAM) Extending the TAM Using a Condition of Attachment in Buddhism.Journal of Educational Computing Research, 52(1), 136–151.

  42. 42.

    Tsimtsiou, Z., Haidich, A. B., Spachos, D., Kokkali, S., Bamidis, P., Dardavesis, T., & Arvanitidou, M. (2015). Internet addiction in Greek medical students: an online survey. Academic Psychiatry, 39(3), 300–304.

  43. 43.

    Tynes, Brendesha M., and Suzanne L. Markoe. “The role of color-blind racial attitudes in reactions to racial discrimination on social network sites.” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education 3.1 (2010): 1.

  44. 44.

    Uddin, S., Thompson, K., Schwendimann, B., & Piraveenan, M. (2014). The impact of study load on the dynamics of longitudinal email communications among students. Computers & Education, 72, 209–219.

  45. 45.

    Valerio, G., Herrera-Murillo, D. J., Villanueva-Puente, F., Herrera-Murillo, N., & del Carmen Rodríguez-Martínez, M. (2015). The relationship between post formats and digital engagement: a study of the Facebook pages of Mexican universities. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 12(1), 50–63.

  46. 46.

    Vial, A. C., Starks, T. J., & Parsons, J. T. (2014). Finding and recruiting the highest risk HIV-negative men who have sex with men. AIDS education and prevention: official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education, 26(1), 56.

  47. 47.

    Whipple, Elizabeth C., Kacy L. Allgood, and Elizabeth M. Larue. “Third-year medical students’ knowledge of privacy and security issues concerning mobile devices.” Medical teacher 34.8 (2012): e532–e548.

  48. 48.

    Williams, J., Feild, C., & James, K. (2011). The effects of a social media policy on pharmacy students’ Facebook security settings. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 75(9), 177.

  49. 49.

    Wodzicki, K., Schwämmlein, E., & Moskaliuk, J. (2012). “Actually, I wanted to learn”: study-related knowledge exchange on social networking sites. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(1), 9–14.

  50. 50.

    Wohn, D. Y., & LaRose, R. (2014). Effects of loneliness and differential usage of Facebook on college adjustment of first-year students. Computers & Education, 76, 158–167.

  51. 51.

    Wohn, D. Y., Ellison, N. B., Khan, M. L., Fewins-Bliss, R., & Gray, R. (2013). The role of social media in shaping first-generation high school students’ college aspirations: A social capital lens. Computers & Education, 63, 424–436.

  52. 52.

    Zablith, F., Fernandez, M., & Rowe, M. (2015). Production and consumption of university linked data. Interactive Learning Environments, 23(1), 55–78.

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Lopes, R.M., Faria, D.J.G.S., Fidalgo-Neto, A.A. et al. Facebook in educational research: a bibliometric analysis. Scientometrics 111, 1591–1621 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-017-2294-1

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Keywords

  • Social network
  • Facebook
  • Bibliometry
  • Educational research