Scientometrics

, Volume 102, Issue 1, pp 195–212 | Cite as

Comparative analysis of the scientific output of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia

  • Edita G. Gzoyan
  • Lusine A. Hovhannisyan
  • Sofya A. Aleksanyan
  • Narine A. Ghazaryan
  • Simon R. Hunanyan
  • Ahmed Bourghida
  • Shushanik A. Sargsyan
Article

Abstract

The article discusses the scientific output of the three South Caucasus republics: Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia (Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia are widely referred to as Transcaucasia Republics or South Caucasus Republics). It focuses on the scientific publications of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia indexed in the Web of Science international database. The article first examines the role of the three republics in Soviet science and the scientific papers they produced during the last decade of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The article then studies the scientific situation in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia after the restoration of their independence in 1991, reviewing the three republics’ scientific publications, their citations and their scientific cooperation, as well as other scientific indicators.

Keywords

Bibliometric analysis Scientific output Armenia Azerbaijan Georgia South Caucasus/Transcaucasia 

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Hungary 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edita G. Gzoyan
    • 1
  • Lusine A. Hovhannisyan
    • 1
  • Sofya A. Aleksanyan
    • 1
  • Narine A. Ghazaryan
    • 1
  • Simon R. Hunanyan
    • 1
  • Ahmed Bourghida
    • 2
  • Shushanik A. Sargsyan
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Scientific Information Analysis and MonitoringIIAP NAS RAYerevanArmenia
  2. 2.Corporate Accounts, Scientific and Scholarly Research, EuropeThomson ReutersLondonUK

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