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Research involving women and health in the Medline database, 1965–2005: co-term analysis and visualization of main lines of research

Abstract

This paper shows the main lines of research concerning health and women, as registered in the Medline database, broken down into four 10-year periods: 1965–1974, 1975–1984, 1985–1994, and 1995–2005. The units of analysis used were the Medline “MeSH” major terms, processed by means of co-term analysis. For graphic representation, the social network approach was used, with pruning performed by Pathfinder Networks (PFNET), so as to concentrate the displays. Factor analysis was used to group the descriptors and identify the main lines of research involving health and women. The results show that research on Health and Women has increased and undergone significant changes over the past 40 years, yet such studies are not given due importance.

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Acknowledgments

This study was made possible through an agreement with the Observatorio de Salud de la Mujer, under Spain’s Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo. The authors wish to express their gratitude to the anonymous reviewers for their many useful comments, suggestions and help.

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Correspondence to Benjamín Vargas-Quesada.

Appendices

Annex I

See Tables 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.

Table 6 Factor membership
Table 7 Factor membership
Table 8 Factor membership
Table 9 Factor membership
Table 10 Factor membership

Annex II

Descriptors (Ranked by number of axis and factor loadings) Frequency
Full period
1965–2005
Frequency
1st period
1965–1974
Frequency
2nd period
1975–1984
Frequency
3rd period
1985–1994
Frequency
4th period
1995–2005
Mammography 5,842 256 577 1,630 3,379
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols 4,405    1,404 3,001
Antineoplastic Agents 2,532   591   1,941
Tamoxifen 2,976   299 918 1,759
Receptors, Estrogen 2,044   822 1,222  
Carcinoma 2,261 455 590 1,216  
Breast 3,598   543 1,227 1,828
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating 1,744 229 432 1,083  
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast 3,108     3,108
Mass Screening 15,023 712 1,183 3,998 9,130
Estrogens 1,081 443 638   
Breast Neoplasms 90,676 5,540 13,049 23,188 48,899
Estrogen Replacement Therapy 6,733    1,251 5,482
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms 3,528 383 414 819 1,912
Patient Acceptance of Health Care 3,611    919 2,692
Menopause 7,460 834 1,472 2,422 2,732
Gender Identity 4,377   732 1,862 1,783
Violence 4,028   355 1,096 2,577
Adolescent Behavior 2,008     2,008
Social Support 2,658    815 1,843
Adaptation, Psychological 11,305 455 950 3,529 6,371
Stress, Psychological 12,245 630 1,740 3,187 6,688
Family 9,529 724 1,594 3,322 3,889
Aged 6,809 653 1,765 1,979 2,412
Neoplasms 3,229   354 856 2,019
Employment 3,101   486 798 1,817
Quality of Life 2,986     2,986
Health Status 8,120   388 1,677 6,055
Mothers 7,030   651 1,949 4,430
Attitude to Health 13,507 492 1,143 2,755 9,117
Women 5,860 372 1,316 2,004 2,168
Gender Identity 4,377   732 1,862 1,783
Nurses 1,774   560 1,214  
Mental Disorders 4,609 447 555 1,146 2,461
Health Promotion 5,045    1,256 3,789
Health Education 7,012 387 1,084 2,125 3,416
Health Behavior 4,508    931 3,577
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice 8,906    1,580 7,326
African Americans 2,953    691 2,262
Women’s Health 6,230    934 5,296
Family Planning Services 3,300 1,108 1,189 1,003  
Health Services Accessibility 2,842     2,842
Attitude of Health Personnel 8,681 253 667 1,868 5,893
Poverty 1,906     1,906
Smoking 3,571   417 955 2,199
Patient Acceptance of Health Care 3,611    919 2,692
Women 5,860 372 1,316 2,004 2,168
Attitude to Health 13,507 492 1,143 2,755 9,117
Adolescent Behavior 2,008     2,008
Sexual Behavior 8,418 570 1,242 2,490 4,116
Abortion, Induced 7,064 958 2,010 1,796 2,300
Abortion, Legal 2,708 922 878 908  
Ethics, Medical 4,019 239 584 1,414 1,782
Decision Making 2,340     2,340
Pregnancy Complications 31,321 6,177 6,570 8,017 10,557
Alcoholism 1,703   541 1,162  
Substance Related Disorders 16,657 1,656 2,444 5,053 7,504
Fetus 10,884 2,227 3,138 2,492 3,027
Mental Disorders 4,609 447 555 1,146 2,461
Smoking 3,571   417 955 2,199
Anti HIV Agents 3,019     3,019
HIV 1 6,345    1,523 4,822
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious 3,097    891 2,206
HIV Infections 25,671    4,771 20,900
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome 14,441   417 8,771 5,253
Sexual Behavior 8,418 570 1,242 2,490 4,116

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Zulueta, M.A., Cantos-Mateos, G., Vargas-Quesada, B. et al. Research involving women and health in the Medline database, 1965–2005: co-term analysis and visualization of main lines of research. Scientometrics 88, 679 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-011-0455-1

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Keywords

  • Medline
  • Co-term
  • Health
  • Women
  • Research
  • Social networks
  • PFNET
  • Maps