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An analysis and comparison of scientometric data between journals of physics, chemistry and engineering

Abstract

By employing the Pearson correlation, Fisher-and t-tests, the present study analyzes and compares scientometric data including number of source items, number of citations, impact factor, immediacy index, citing half-life and cited half-life, for essential journals in physics, chemistry and engineering, from SCI JCR on the Web 2002. The results of the study reveal that for all the scientometric indicators, except the cited half-life, there is no significant mean difference between physics and chemistry subjects indicating similar citation behavior among the scientists. There is no significant mean difference in the citing half-life among the three subjects. Significant mean difference is generally observed for most of the scientometric indicators between engineering and physics (or chemistry) demonstrating the difference in citation behavior among engineering researchers and scientists in physics or chemistry.

Significant correlations among number of source items, number of citations, impact factor, and immediacy index and between cited half-life and citing half-life generally prevail for each of the three subjects. On the contrary, in general, there is no significant correlation between the cited half-life and other scientometric indicators. The three subjects present the same strength of the correlations between number of source items and number of citations, between number of citations and impact factor, and between cited half-life and citing half-life.

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Correspondence to Ming-Yueh Tsay.

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Tsay, MY. An analysis and comparison of scientometric data between journals of physics, chemistry and engineering. Scientometrics 78, 279–293 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-007-1996-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-007-1996-1

Keywords

  • Impact Factor
  • Citation Behavior
  • Journal Citation Report
  • Journal Impact Factor
  • Immediacy Index