Advertisement

Science & Education

, Volume 18, Issue 10, pp 1341–1358 | Cite as

Recent Developments in Young-Earth Creationist Geology

  • Timothy H. Heaton
Article

Abstract

Young-earth creationism has undergone a shift in emphasis toward building of historical models that incorporate Biblical and scientific evidence and the acceptance of scientific conclusions that were formerly rejected. The RATE Group admitted that massive amounts of radioactive decay occurred during earth history but proposed a period of accelerated decay during Noah’s Flood to fit the resulting history into a young-earth timeframe. Finding a mechanism for the acceleration and dealing with the excessive heat and radiation it would generate posed major problems for the project. Catastrophic plate tectonics was proposed to explain continental movements in a short timeframe and serve as a trigger for Noah’s Flood, but other creationists rejected the idea citing hopeless chronological problems. Creationists have also sought to explain the order of the fossil record and the Ice Age in a young-earth timeframe. An examination of these efforts demonstrates the anti-scientific nature of using the Bible as a non-negotiable framework for earth history.

Keywords

Fossil Record Intelligent Design Ocean Floor Rate Project Nuclear Decay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Austin SA (1994) Grand canyon: monument to catastrophe. Institute for Creation Research, El CajonGoogle Scholar
  2. Austin SA, Baumgardner JR, Humphreys DR, Snelling AA, Vardiman L, Wise KP (1994) Catastrophic plate tectonics: a global Flood model of earth history. In: Walsh RE (ed) Proceedings of the third international conference on creationism. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 609–621Google Scholar
  3. Baumgardner JR (1987) Numerical simulations of the large-scale tectonic changes accompanying the Flood. In: Walsh RE, Brooks CL, Crowell RS (eds) Proceedings of the first international conference on creationism, vol 2. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 17–30Google Scholar
  4. Baumgardner JR (1990) 3-D finite element simulation of the global tectonic changes accompanying Noah’s Flood. In: Walsh RE, Brooks CL (eds) Proceedings of the second international conference on creationism, vol 2. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 35–45Google Scholar
  5. Baumgardner JR (2002a) Dealing carefully with the data. J Creat 16(1):68–72Google Scholar
  6. Baumgardner JR (2002b) A constructive quest for truth. J Creation 16(1):78–81Google Scholar
  7. Baumgardner JR (2003) Catastrophic plate tectonics: the physics behind the Genesis Flood. In: Ivey RL Jr (ed) Proceedings of the fifth international conference on creationism. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 113–126Google Scholar
  8. Baumgardner JR (2005) 14C evidence for a recent global flood and a young earth. In: Vardiman L, Snelling AA, Chaffin EF (eds) Radioisotopes and the age of the earth, vol II: results of a young-earth creationist research initiative. Institute for Creation Research, El Cajon, pp 587–630Google Scholar
  9. Clark H (1946) The new diluvialism. Science Publications, AngwinGoogle Scholar
  10. Clark H (1968) Fossils, flood, and fire. Outdoor Pictures, EscondidaGoogle Scholar
  11. DeYoung D (2005) Thousands… not billions: challenging an icon of evolution, questioning the age of the earth. Master Books, Forest GreenGoogle Scholar
  12. Froede CR Jr (2000) Questions regarding the Wilson cycle in plate tectonics and catastrophic plate tectonics. In: Reed JK (ed) Plate tectonics: a different view. Creation Research Society, St. Joseph, pp 147–160Google Scholar
  13. Horstmeyer MF, Baumgardner JR (2003) What initiated the Flood cataclysm? In: Ivey RL Jr (ed) Proceedings of the fifth international conference on creationism. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 155–164Google Scholar
  14. Humphreys DR (1986) Reversals of the earth’s magnetic field during the Genesis Flood. In: Walsh RE, Brooks CL, Crowell RS (eds) Proceedings of the first international conference on creationism, vol 2. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 113–126Google Scholar
  15. Humphreys DR (1990) Physical mechanism for reversals of the earth’s magnetic field during the Flood. In: Walsh RE, Brooks CL (eds) Proceedings of the second international conference on creationism, vol 2. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 130–137Google Scholar
  16. Humphreys DR (2000) Accelerated nuclear decay: a viable hypothesis? In: Vardiman L, Snelling AA, Chaffin EF (eds) Radioisotopes and the age of the earth: a young-earth creationist research initiative. Institute for Creation Research, El Cajon, pp 333–379Google Scholar
  17. Humphreys DR (2005) Young helium diffusion age of zircons supports accelerated nuclear decay. In: Vardiman L, Snelling AA, Chaffin EF (eds) Radioisotopes and the age of the earth, vol II: results of a young-earth creationist research initiative. Institute for Creation Research, El Cajon, pp 25–100Google Scholar
  18. Marsh FL (1941) Fundamental Biology. Self-published, LincolnGoogle Scholar
  19. Marsh FL (1944) Evolution, creation, and science. Review and Herald, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  20. Morris HM (1972) The remarkable birth of planet earth. Creation-Life Publishers, San DiegoGoogle Scholar
  21. Morris HM (1974) Scientific creationism. Creation-Life Publishers, San DiegoGoogle Scholar
  22. Morris JD (2003) Creation ministry’s strategy for the future. In: Fifth international conference on creationism, evening session 1, audio MP3. Creation Science Fellowship, PittsburghGoogle Scholar
  23. Oard MJ (1990) An ice age caused by the Genesis Flood. Institute for Creation Research, El CajonGoogle Scholar
  24. Oard MJ (1997) Ancient ice ages or gigantic submarine landslides? Creation Research Society Monograph Series, No. 5Google Scholar
  25. Oard MJ (2000) Subduction unlikely—plate tectonics improbable. In: Reed JK (ed) Plate tectonics: a different view. Creation Research Society, St. Joseph, pp 93–145Google Scholar
  26. Oard MJ (2002a) Is catastrophic plate tectonics part of earth history? J Creat 16(1):64–68Google Scholar
  27. Oard MJ (2002b) Does the catastrophic plate tectonics model assume too much uniformitarianism? J Creat 16(1):73–77Google Scholar
  28. Oard MJ (2002c) Dealing carefully with the data. J Creat 16(1):82–85Google Scholar
  29. Oard MJ (2005) The frozen record: examining the ice core history of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Institute for Creation Research, El CajonGoogle Scholar
  30. Oard MJ (Undated) Evidence for the run-off of the flood waters. http://www.answersingenesis.org/events/bio.aspx?Speaker_ID=24
  31. Price GM (1916) Back to the Bible or the New Protestantism. Review and Herald Pub, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  32. Price GM (1935) The modern Flood theory of geology. Fleming H. Revell, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  33. Reed JK, Bennett CB, Froede CR Jr, Oard MJ, Woodmorappe J (2000) An introduction to plate tectonics and catastrophic plate tectonics. In: Reed JK (ed) Plate tectonics: a different view. Creation Research Society, St. Joseph, pp 11–21Google Scholar
  34. Vardiman L (1993) Ice cores and the age of the earth. Institute for Creation Research, El CajonGoogle Scholar
  35. Vardiman L (2001) Climates before and after the Genesis Flood: numerical models and their implications. Institute for Creation Research, El CajonGoogle Scholar
  36. Vardiman L (2005a) Introduction. In: Vardiman L, Snelling AA, Chaffin EF (eds) Radioisotopes and the age of the earth, vol II: results of a young-earth creationist research initiative. Institute for Creation Research, El Cajon, pp 1–24Google Scholar
  37. Vardiman L (2005b) What comes after RATE? Acts and facts, impact article #387. Institute for Creation Research, El CajonGoogle Scholar
  38. Vardiman L, Austin SA, Baumgardner JR, Boyd SW, Chaffin EF, DeYoung DB et al (2005) Summary of evidence for a young earth from the RATE project. In: Vardiman L, Snelling AA, Chaffin EF (eds) Radioisotopes and the age of the earth, vol II: results of a young-earth creationist research initiative. Institute for Creation Research, El Cajon, pp 735–772Google Scholar
  39. Whitcomb JC, Morris HM (1961) The Genesis Flood: the biblical record and its scientific implications. Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Co, PhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar
  40. Wise KP (2002) Faith, form, and time. Broadman & Holman Publishers, NashvilleGoogle Scholar
  41. Wise KP (2003) The pre-Flood floating forest: a study in paleontological pattern recognition. In: Ivey RL Jr (ed) Proceedings of the fifth international conference on creationism. Creation Science Fellowship, Pittsburgh, pp 371–382Google Scholar
  42. Wise KP (2005) The flores skeleton and human baraminology. Occasional Papers of the Baraminology Study Group, No. 6Google Scholar
  43. Wood TC (2002) The AGEing process: rapid post-Flood intrabaraminic diversification caused by altruistic genetic elements (AGEs). Origins 54:5–34Google Scholar
  44. Wood TC (2006a) The Chimpanzee genome and the problem of biological similarity. Occasional Papers of the Baraminology Study Group, No. 7Google Scholar
  45. Wood TC (2006b) The current status of baraminology. Creat Res Soc Q 43(3):149–158Google Scholar
  46. Wood TC, Murray KJ (2003) Understanding the pattern of life: origins and organization of the species. Broadman & Holman, NashvilleGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of South DakotaVermillionUSA

Personalised recommendations