Social support timing and persistence in nascent entrepreneurship: exploring when instrumental and emotional support is most effective

Abstract

This paper investigates how the timing of social support, both emotional and instrumental support, affects entrepreneurial persistence of nascent entrepreneurs. Drawing on social support theory, we hypothesize that the effectiveness of support depends on when, during the venture development process (number of gestation activities completed), it is provided. We also propose that the impact of social support depends on when during the entrepreneur’s life stage (age) that support is made available. Testing our hypotheses using a longitudinal dataset of nascent entrepreneurs, we find that emotional support is most relevant earlier on during venture development, while instrumental support is most relevant for entrepreneurs who begin their businesses in earlier life stages.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Specifically, we found that respondents were less likely to have a partner (p < 0.01), more likely to be married (p < 0.05), and more likely to have children (p < 0.05).

  2. 2.

    While acknowledging that the Harman test is a rather weak test of common method bias, we do not have available data for other statistical tests (Podsakoff et al. 2003).

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Klyver, K., Honig, B. & Steffens, P. Social support timing and persistence in nascent entrepreneurship: exploring when instrumental and emotional support is most effective. Small Bus Econ 51, 709–734 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11187-017-9964-5

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Keywords

  • Nascent entrepreneurship
  • Social support
  • Social networks
  • Emotional support
  • Timing

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  • M13