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Theory and Society

, Volume 45, Issue 4, pp 319–360 | Cite as

Situated political innovation: explaining the historical emergence of new modes of political practice

  • Robert S. Jansen
Article

Abstract

Scholars have recognized that contentious political action typically draws on relatively stable scripts for the enactment of claims making. But if such repertoires of political practice are generally reproduced over time, why and how do new modes of practice emerge? Employing a pragmatist perspective on social action, this article argues that change in political repertoires can be usefully understood as a result of situated political innovation—i.e., of the creative recombination of existing practices, through experimentation over time, by interacting political agents for whom old repertoires were proving inadequate to the changing context of action. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by applying it to explain the historical emergence of a new set of populist mobilizing practices in early twentieth-century Peru. The results have implications for the study of political action and historical change.

Keywords

Historical sociology Peru Populist mobilization Political repertoires Pragmatism Twentieth century Latin America 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to Elizabeth Armstrong, Chris Bail, Josh Bloom, Rogers Brubaker, Howard Kimeldorf, Greta Krippner, Iddo Tavory, Andreas Wimmer, Geneviève Zubrzycki, and the Theory and Society Editors and reviewers for their valuable criticisms and suggestions. Earlier versions of this article were presented at the 2015 UCLA Comparative Social Analysis Seminar Reunion Conference and at the Sociology departments of the University of British Columbia, the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan, the University of Toronto, and Grand Valley State University, where audience members also provided helpful comments. Thanks are due to the generous staff at the archives and libraries mentioned in the text, as well as to Demetrio Laurente Eslava and Simeon Newman for their research assistance. The archival research was supported by a Fulbright IIE Fellowship and by a small grant from UCLA’s Latin American Institute. Writing was supported in part by the Michigan Society of Fellows.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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